Archives par mot-clé : History

Erin Connelly on Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections at the Library of Congress

 

Erin Connelly discussed her research involving the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, combined with a severely stalled discovery pipeline for new antibiotics.

Speaker Biography: Erin Connelly is the CLIR-Mellon Fellow for Data Curation in medieval studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts (Penn Libraries).

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

« Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective.
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

Conference – La vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge – Yann Cantin – Cité des Sciences de Paris

La vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge

Vendredi 9 juin, de 18h30 à 20h. RDV à l’auditorium, niveau 0.

Dans le cadre du cycle de conférence organisé par la Cité des Sciences « Dans la tête de l’homme médiéval »

L’imaginaire collectif retient du Moyen Âge la chevalerie, les châteaux forts et les cathédrales. La réalité de ces mille ans d’histoire (V° – XVI° siècles) est plus riche et plus contrastée comme en attestent les recherches récentes en archéologie et en histoire. Comment l’homme médiéval se représente le monde ? Quelles sont ses connaissances en astronomie, en médecine ? Quels sont ses croyances et ses rites ?

« Quelle était la vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge ? Serait-elle si obscure comme le disaient les auteurs du XIXe siècle ? Ou alors, bien plus libre que l’on pensait ? La période médiévale était pourtant la matrice de notre langue, le noétomalalien. C’est dans ce contexte particulier entre le développement des centres monastiques, la croissance des villes, les échanges des idées entre les différents royaumes, duchés et comtés, que les communautés sourdes ont pu trouver leur place. De ce que l’on sait,  les communautés sourdes du XVIIIe siècle sont le résultat d’un long processus commencé mille années plus tôt. »

Avec Yann Cantin, historien, maître de conférence à l’université de Paris 8

Interprétation Français/LSF assurée.

Accès gratuit sur inscription : https://www.weezevent.com/la-vie-des-sourds-au-moyen-age

Organisator website

 

Le laboratoire ICT (Identités, Cultures, Territoires, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) et le Groupe de Recherche sur l’Eugénisme et le Racisme (UFR EILA, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) sont heureux de vous inviter à une discussion sur Anthropologie et Histoire du Handicap autour de la présentation des derniers ouvrages de Henri-Jacques Stiker (chercheur associé au laboratoire ICT, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot).

Cette rencontre, suivie d’un verre de l’amitié, se tiendra le mercredi 22 mars 2017 de 17h à 19h à l’université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot, bâtiment Sophie Germain, amphithéâtre Turing (8 Place Aurélie Nemours, 75013 Paris, plan en pièce jointe, accessible aux Personnes à mobilité réduite).

Pour toutes demandes complémentaires merci de contacter ninon.dubourg@gmail.com.

En espérant vous accueillir nombreux à cette présentation d’ouvrages,

Nos cordiales salutations.

CFP – Society for the Social History of Medicine Postgraduate Conference – Shangai

Society for the Social History of Medicine Postgraduate Conference 2017
In cooperation with the University of Strathclyde and Shanghai University
Funded by the Wellcome Trust

Health Histories: The Next Generation
October 12-13, 2017
Shanghai University, China

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/

The Society for the Social History of Medicine periodically hosts an international conference for postgraduate students. The 2017 conference committee welcomes papers on any topic within the discipline of the social history of medicine and particularly encourage proposals for papers and panels that critically examine or challenge some aspect of the history of medicine and health. We welcome a range of methodological approaches, geographical regions, and time periods.

Proposals should be based on new research from postgraduate students currently registered in a University programme. Paper submissions should include a 250-word abstract, including five key words and a short (1-page) CV. Panel submissions should feature three papers (each with a 250-word abstract, including five key words, and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.

For postgraduate students not currently funded through an existing fellowship or grant, funding is available to cover the costs associated with visas, travel, and accommodation in Shanghai. Upon confirmation of an accepted abstract, each postgraduate student is required to apply for a visa to travel to China. For more information about visas, please see https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china/entry-requirements.

All postgraduate delegates must register (or already be registered) as members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine. For more information about SSHM student membership, please see http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/sochis/access_purchase/price_list.html.

To propose an abstract, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/abstractsubmission/

To propose a panel, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/panelsubmission/

Submissions and queries should be sent to Mrs Caroline Marley: cshhh-admin@strath.ac.uk.

Conference Organizers:
Dr Stephen Mawdsley, University of Strathclyde
Professor Yong-an Zhang, Shanghai University

Abstract Deadline: 10 March 2017

CFP – ALTER – Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values – University of Lausanne

6th annual conference ALTER

Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values

University of Lausanne

 

La Société européenne de recherche sur le handicap – ALTER a retenu la Suisse pour l’organisation de sa 6ème conférence annuelle, qui se déroulera les 6 et 7 juillet 2017 à l’Université de Lausanne. Cette conférence, qui réunit chaque année une centaine de chercheurs et chercheuses venant d’Europe et d’autres continents, aura pour thème en 2017: «Handicap, Reconnaissance et “Vivre ensemble”. Diversité des pratiques et pluralité des valeurs».
L’appel à communications (délai de soumission: 22 janvier 2017), des informations complémentaires et les indications pour vous inscrire se trouvent sous le lien: http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

The European Society for Disability Research – ALTER chose Switzerland to host its 6th annual conference, to be held on 6 and 7 July 2017 at the University of Lausanne. This conference, which annually brings together more than one hundred researchers from Europe and from other continents, in 2017 will have the following theme: «Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values».

For the call for papers (deadline: 22 January 2017), additional information and instructions to register, please see the link below:
http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

Programme – Disability and Religion, 10th Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World, Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

f

Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World

10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 2nd December

10:00 Welcome (Irina Metzler, Swansea University)

10:15-11:15 Opening Keynote Address

Responsibility, Sin, and Impairment in the Middle Ages

Wendy J. Turner (Augusta University)

11:15-12:45 Panel: Disabled Religious: Saints, Monks and Anchoresses

Moderator: Alicia Spencer-Hall

Disability or Super-ability? Saints’ Infirmities as a Tool for Constructing Sanctity

(Jenni Kuuliala, University of Tampere)

Deaf, Monks and Sign Language

(Yann Cantin, Université-Paris 8)

Ancrene Riwle: Disabling the Able, How Un-Medieval!

(Stan Booth, University of Winchester)

12:45-13:45 Lunch

13:45-14:40 Panel: Non-conformist Bodies

Moderator: Stan Booth

The Hun and the Hunchback

Mark Humphries (Swansea University)

‘Sumo michi baculum’: Problematizing the Purpose of ‘Walking Sticks’ in the Late Middle Ages

(Rachael Gillibrand, University of Leeds)

14:40-15:35 Panel: Miracles and Metaphors

Moderator: Ninon Dubourg

The Cure-Seeking Experiences of Disabled Children in Twelfth-Century English Miracula

(Ruth Salter, University of Reading)

A Double Absence: Cupid and Blind Lucy Reading John Donne’s ‘Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day, Being The Shortest Day’

(Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester)

15:35-16:00 Coffee Break

16:00-16:50 Panel: Relevance of Digital Tools for Medieval Manuscript Studies

(Erin Connelly, University of Pennsylvania)

This panel will take the form of a presentation followed by a workshop inviting audience participation and discussion

SATURDAY 3rd December

9:15-10:45 Panel: Disability and Mental ‘Abnormality’

Moderator: Wendy Turner

Graeco-Latin Medical Learning in an Early Irish Pseudo-Etymology of Boicmell ‘Fool’

(Anna Matheson, Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique, Rennes)

The Holy Fool and the Madman: When was Mental Abnormality a Disability?

(Claire Trenery, Royal Holloway, University of London)

Skiptingr, Congeon and Wehselkind: Exploring the Medieval Discourse on Changelings and Idiocy through Vernacular Insults

(Rose Sawyer, University of Leeds)

10:45-11:05 Coffee Break

11:05-12:00 Panel: Disability and Leprosy

Moderator: Trish Skinner

Disability and Ability within the Leper Houses of Medieval Normandy

(Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library)

Redeemed by a Good Death!

(Timothy Jones, University of Cardiff)

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-13:55 Panel: Disability in the Earlier Middle Ages

Moderator: Christina Lee

Finding Disability in Early Medieval Sources: The Case of Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester

(Alison Hudson, The British Library)

A Disabled Corpse – An Exploration of the Potential Significance of an Anglo Saxon Burial Cluster from Great Chesterford, Essex

(Stephanie Evelyn-Wright, University of Southampton)

13:55-14:50 Panel: ‘Alien’ Disability

Moderator: Irina Metzler

‘A horse ought to be held dear due to its goodness; because one should desire goodness over beauty’: Utility, Disfigurement, and Occupational Health in Later Medieval Horse Medicine

(Sunny Harrison, University of Leeds)

Mohammed the Epileptic: Religious Propaganda in the Middle Ages

(Hillary Burgardt, Swansea University)

14:50-15:05 Coffee Break

15:05-16:00 Panel: Periodization in Disability History: A Roundtable

Participants:

David Turner (Swansea University, panel co-ordinator and chair)

Trish Skinner (Swansea University)

Bianca Frohne (Universität Bremen)

Daniel Blackie (University of Oulu)

16:00-16:35 Concluding Keynote Address

Disease, Disability and Medicine: Past, Present and Future(s)

Christina Lee (University of Nottingham)

16:35-16:45 Closing Remarks

Many thanks to the organiser of this year, Irina Metzler.

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici

Conference – Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History – Monica H. Green – AHA conference

Session : Historians and Geneticists in Collaborative Research

AHA Session 254
Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:30 PM-5:00 PM
Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center, Ballroom Level) Denver.
Chair:
John R. McNeill, Georgetown University

Session Abstract:

An editorial in Nature (25 May 2016) notes that historians have been critical of recent interpretations of European migrations by geneticists, but from their armchairs. Princeton Medieval historian Patrick Geary is quoted as urging historians to be more proactive and take part in genetic research: “If historians do not get involved and engage with this technology seriously, we’re going to see more and more studies that are done by geneticists with very little input from historians, or from frankly second-rate historians.” This session includes presentations by two historians and one geneticist, to show how collaborative study linking historians and geneticists can advance the quality of historical studies relying on genetic information. The session is intended to encourage discussion among historians, especially early-career historians, on how involvement in research and study of the genetic-historical literature can lead to rewarding careers that substantially advance knowledge of the human past from this new angle.

Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History

Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:50 PM, Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center)

Monica H. Green, Arizona State University

Every pre-modern historian knows how rarely we have all the evidence we want. We know that something happened in history’s silences because we know that human societies persisted. So, too, the palaeogeneticist must assume the continuity of life between the few random molecular fossils uncovered from the past, for that is the basic premise of evolutionary theory. But in all fields that deal with gap-ridden evidence, the question remains: what are legitimate methods for construing what happened in those gaps?Although climate scientists and historians now work toward consilience of written and physical data, that happy détente has yet to be achieved in biological history. Yes, the call to resist “cherry picking those milestones in human history that are best recorded” should be heeded. But what happens when this new kind of bioarchaeology treads into territory historians consider theirs, where there are written records? Who cedes to whom?

This paper will focus not on human genetics but on the molecular histories of the pathogens that kill and maim us. I will use the example of the Second Plague Pandemic (14th-19th centuries) to assert that consilience with History, with a capital ‘H’, is urgently needed for one simple reason: because the most disruptive biological actors in epidemic circumstances are humans themselves.

More information on the AHA program !

New publication – The Routledge History of Disease ed. by Mark Jackson

Mark Jackson, The Routledge history of disease, 2016.

 

The Routledge History of Disease draws on innovative scholarship in the history of medicine to explore the challenges involved in writing about health and disease throughout the past and across the globe, presenting a varied range of case studies and perspectives on the patterns, technologies and narratives of disease that can be identified in the past and that continue to influence our present.

Organized thematically, chapters examine particular forms and conceptualizations of disease, covering subjects from leprosy in medieval Europe and cancer screening practices in twentieth-century USA to the ayurvedic tradition in ancient India and the pioneering studies of mental illness that took place in nineteenth-century Paris, as well as discussing the various sources and methods that can be used to understand the social and cultural contexts of disease. The book is divided into four sections, focusing in turn on historical models of disease, shifting temporal and geographical patterns of disease, the impact of new technologies on categorizing, diagnosing and treating disease, and the different ways in which patients and practitioners, as well as novelists and playwrights, have made sense of their experiences of disease in the past.

International in scope, chronologically wide-ranging and illustrated with images and maps, this comprehensive volume is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of health through the ages.

 

Table of Contents

List of figures

List of tables

Acknowledgements

List of contributors

1. Perspectives on the History of Disease – Mark Jackson

Part One: Models

2. Humours and Humoral Theory – Jim Hankinson

3. Models of Disease in Ayurvedic Medicine – Dominik Wujastyk

4. Religion, Magic and Medicine – Catherine Rider

5. Contagion – Michael Worboys

6. Emotions and Mental Illness – Elena Carrera

7. Deviance as Disease: The Medicalization of Sex and Crime – Jana Funke

Part Two: Patterns

8. Pandemics – Mark Harrison

9. Patterns of Animal Disease – Abigail Woods

10. Patterns of Plague in Late Medieval and Early-Modern Europe – Samuel Cohn

11. Symptoms of Empire: Cholera in Southeast Asia, 1820-1850 – Robert Peckham

12. Disease, Geography, and the Market: Epidemics of Cholera in Tokyo in the Late Nineteenth Century – Akihito Suzuki

13. Histories and Narratives of Yellow Fever in Latin America – Monica Garcia

14. Race, Disease and Public Health: Perceptions of Māori Health – Katrina Ford

15. Re-writing the ‘English disease’: Migration, Ethnicity and ‘Tropical Rickets’ – Roberta Bivins

16. Social Geographies of Sickness and Health in Contemporary Paris: Toward a Human Ecology of Mortality in the 2003 Heat Wave Disaster – Richard Keller

Part Three: Technologies

17. Disability and Prosthetics in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-century England – David Turner

18. Disease, Rehabilitation and Pain – Julie Anderson

19. From Paraffin to PIP: The Surgical Search for the Perfect Breast – Fay Bound Alberti

20. Cancer Screening – David Cantor

21. Medical Bacteriology: Microbes and Disease, 1870 – 2000 – Christoph Gradmann

22. Technology and the `Social Disease’ – Helen Bynum

23. Reorganising Chronic Disease Management: Diabetes and Bureaucratic Technologies in Post-War British General Practice – Martin Moore

24. Before HIV: Venereal Disease Among Homosexually Active Men in the Anglo-American World – Richard McKay

Part Four: Narratives

25. Leprosy and Identity in the Middle Ages – Elma Brenner

26. French Medical Consultations by Mail, 1600-1800 – Robert Weston

27. The Clinical Narratives of James Parkinson’s Essay on the Shaking Palsy (1817) – Brian Hurwitz

28. Digital Narratives: 4 ‘Hits’ in the History of Migraine – Katherine Foxhall

29. Case Notes and Madness – Alannah Tomkins

30. Literature and Disease: A Novel Contagion – Sam Goodman

31. When Bodies Need Stories in Pictures – Arthur Frank

32. Living in the Present: Illness, Phenomenology, and Well-being – Havi Carel

Index

Find all the information on the editor website (Routledge)