Archives par mot-clé : Disability Studies

CFP – IMC Leeds – Medieval Bodies Ignored

Medieval Bodies Ignored
CfP IMC 2018: Deadline 31St August 2017

Since Caroline Walker Bynum’s 1995 article ‘Why All the Fuss
About the Body?’, the discussion around bodies as historical
bodies has flourished. In these sessions, the intent is to pick out,
from ‘the cacophony of discourses’ that medieval people used to
discuss the body, a few of the notes that are sometimes
overlooked. Discussion post—Caroline Walker Bynum has often
focused on the human body, but her work has also opened up a
wider examination of the ways in which non —human bodies were
conceptualised. Non-human animals, environmental bodies and
socio-political bodies are all discussed in relation to humans and
the non-human body. Equally, humans could also be discussed in
relation to non-human bodies, either in a positive or a derogatory
sense. These sessions will explore how human and non-human
bodies have influenced each other during the Middle Ages and in
scholarship. By examining these seemingly separate discourses in
concert with one another the impact of ideas around
embodiment upon the study of the Middle Ages is revealed and parallels and connections can be exploited.

Themes

‘ Discourses around human and non-human animal bodies:
scientific, literary, juridico—legal.

‘ Concepts of environmental bodies: bodies of water,
geological and geographical bodies, human / non—human
geography.

‘ Political and social bodies: the body politic, the politicised
body, guilds and professional bodies, military bodies.

 

The deadline for 200 – 300 word abstracts is 31st August 2017. Please email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com. And follow them on Twitter: @BodiesIgnored

 

Roundtable – #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

#disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a bring your own lunch affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success, and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network. We are now moving into more official outlets for discussion, and are putting together a Roundtable for IMC 2018.

We invite abstracts for 5 minute talks as part of a roundtable discussion about accessibility in Higher Education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness and mental health to name but a few. Papers might address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, or pinpoint an issue that needs addressing.

Please send an abstract of no more than 150 words outlining your talk to alexralee12@gmail.com by August 20th [deadline extended : 15 september !]

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

« Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective.
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

Meetings – Colloquium – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages – SSHM – UCL – 29 sept. 2017

 Meetings – Colloquium – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages – SSHM – UCL – 29 sept. 2017

Last Booking Date for this Event
1st August 2017
DescriptionPain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.

The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It brings together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

Relevant topics for this conference include:

Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works

Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them.

Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives

Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity

Chronic pain and/as disability

The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another

The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain

The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

Keynote address:

Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address: ‘What is Chronic Pain in a Non-Neural Age? Working Definitions, Sources, and Methodologies’.

Confirmed speakers:

-Dr Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and the Saintly Bishop in Medieval England’
-Dr James McKinstry (Durham University, UK), ‘Headaches, Diseases, and Old Age: William Dunbar’s Diagnosis of Chronic Pain’
-Dr Michele Moatt (National Trust and Lancaster University, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and Prophecy in the Twelfth-century Life of Aelred of Rievaulx
-Catherine Coffey (Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland), ‘“Mit zwoelf tugenden stritet si wider das vleisch”: The Body Fighting the Flesh in Mechthild von Magdeburg’s Das fließende Licht der Gottheit
-Katherine Briant (Fordham University, New York, USA), ‘Pain as a Theological Framework in Julian of Norwich’s Vision and Revelation
-Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern University, Switzerland), ‘Mary’s Perpetual Physical Pain: Affective Piety and “Doubling”’
-Prof Wendy J Turner (Augusta University, Georgia, USA), ‘Mental Complications of Pain: Age and Violence in Medieval England’
-Dr Bianca Frohne (University of Bremen, Germany), ‘Living With Pain: Constructions of a Corporeal Experience in Early and High Medieval Miracle Accounts’
-Dr William Maclehose (University College London, UK), ‘A Locus for Healing: Saints’ Shrines and Representations of Chronic Pain’

Registration:

-The conference registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars), though all attendees must register for the conference.
-The registration fee covers refreshments throughout the day for attendees, including tea and coffee at breaks, a sandwich lunch, and a wine reception. If you have any dietary requirements, please list these when you confirm your attendance.
-Registration for the conference will open shortly, and be conducted via the UCL Online Shop, in the ‘Conferences and Events’ category. This page will be updated in due course with a link to the registration page.
Registration closes on 1st August 2017.

More infos on the UCL website

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

 

Friday, May 12 – Evening Events
Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
=> Valley II, LeFevre Lounge Business Meeting

 

Friday 10 AM

214 – BERNHARD 210

Landscape Approaches to the Plague

Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
1. Michelle Ziegler – Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
2. Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln – 44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in
England and Its Implications for Future Research
3. Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville – Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague

 

Saturday 10 AM
345 – VALLEY III ELDRIDGE 309
Piers Plowman and Disability
Sponsor: International Piers Plowman Society
Organizer: Curtis Gruenler, Hope College
Presider: Curtis Gruenler
1. Dana Roders, Purdue Univ. – Intersections of Disability and Sin in Piers Plowman
2. Laura Godfrey, Univ. of Connecticut – Must I Here-Wel to Do-Wel? Sensory Impairments in Piers Plowman
3. Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Dismodern Will

 

Saturday 10 AM
393 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Fair Unknowns (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Arthuriana
Organizer: Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ./Arthuriana
Presider: Dorsey Armstrong,
1. Joseph M. Sullivan, Univ. of Oklahoma – What’s So Interesting About Fair Unknown Romances in Germanic Arthurian Literatures?
2. Kevin J. Harty, La Salle Univ. – Rescued from the Archives: The Fair Unknown on CBS TV in 1951: Mr. I. Magina-tion’s “Sir Gareth, Knight of the Round Table”
3. Christopher A. Snyder, Mississippi State Univ. – Jay Gatsby as the Fair Unknown: Arthurian Resonances in Fitzgerald
4. Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton – (Dis)abling the Fair Unknown: Disability and Gender in Malory’s “Alexander the Orphan”
5. Ryan Naughton, Arizona State Univ.  – Natural Nobility and Fair Unknowns

 

Saturday 10:30 PM
 436 – BERNHARD 158
Space, Place, and Disability (A Panel Discussion)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton
1. Julie Paulson, San Francisco State Univ. – “Fooles that Goon in Goddis Weys”: Mental Disability and Moral Personhood in Late Medieval Literature
2. Danielle Allor, Rutgers Univ.  – “Mobile as Wishes”: Disability, Intersubjectivity, and Community in the Liber confortatorius
3. Leah Pope, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison – The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place: Death and the Embodied Anglo-Saxon Subject
4. Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College – Disability in the Village: Household Care in Late Medieval France

 

Sunday 8:30 AM
527 – BERNHARD 158
Medievalism and Disability (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider :John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
1. Jess Genevieve Bailey, Univ. of California–Berkeley – Urs Graf ’s Daughter Courage: Violence and Disability in Late Medieval Europe
2. Christopher Baswell, Barnard College – A Visual Database for Medieval Disability
3. Tirumular Narayanan, California State Univ.–Chico – Impaired in Camelot: An Analysis of Ableism in Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant
4. Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ. – Trope or Truth? Medievalism and the Ubiquity of Disability
5. Elizabeth Wawrzyniak, Marquette Univ.  – Life Was Like That: The Grotesque Medieval in the Modern Imagination

 

Sunday 10:30 AM

556 – SCHNEIDER 1325
Gray Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders
Organizer: Deborah Thorpe, Univ. of York
Presider: Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College
1. Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. – Treatment of Learning Disabilities and Other Mental Health Issues in Medieval English Medicine and Law
2. Agnes Karpinski, Univ. des Saarlandes  – Madness, Nightmares, Melancholy: Exceptional Mental States in Medieval Com-
mentaries on Aristotle’s De somno
3. Eliza Buhrer, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Attention and Distraction in Medieval Thought

 

 

Full program of the Medieval congress here

News ! New serie editor – Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity – MIP University Press–Arc Humanities Press

Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Geographical Scope

Unrestricted

Chronological Scope

Late Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern

Series advisory board

  • Elizabeth B. Bearden (University of Wisconsin)
  • Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University)
  • Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University)
  • Richard H. Godden (Louisiana State University)
  • Maria Fabricius Hansen (University of Copenhagen)
  • Virginia A. Krause (Brown University)
  • Jennifer Spinks (University of Melbourn)
  • Debra Higgs Strickland (University of Glasgow)
  • Wes Williams (University of Oxford)

Series editors

  • Kathleen Perry Long (Cornell University, USA)
  • Luke Morgan (Monash University, Australia)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

[About them : MIP offers rapid turn-around times, the newest digital policies (including full Open Access compliance), and global distribution. In North America books can be purchased through ISD and in Europe and the rest of the world through NBN International.]

CFP – ALTER – Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values – University of Lausanne

6th annual conference ALTER

Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values

University of Lausanne

 

La Société européenne de recherche sur le handicap – ALTER a retenu la Suisse pour l’organisation de sa 6ème conférence annuelle, qui se déroulera les 6 et 7 juillet 2017 à l’Université de Lausanne. Cette conférence, qui réunit chaque année une centaine de chercheurs et chercheuses venant d’Europe et d’autres continents, aura pour thème en 2017: «Handicap, Reconnaissance et “Vivre ensemble”. Diversité des pratiques et pluralité des valeurs».
L’appel à communications (délai de soumission: 22 janvier 2017), des informations complémentaires et les indications pour vous inscrire se trouvent sous le lien: http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

The European Society for Disability Research – ALTER chose Switzerland to host its 6th annual conference, to be held on 6 and 7 July 2017 at the University of Lausanne. This conference, which annually brings together more than one hundred researchers from Europe and from other continents, in 2017 will have the following theme: «Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values».

For the call for papers (deadline: 22 January 2017), additional information and instructions to register, please see the link below:
http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

New Publication – Journal – Textual Practice Volume 30, 2016 – Issue 7: Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

 

Textual Practice

Volume 30, 2016

Issue 7: Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Foreword [abstract]

Prosthesis, n.

  1. Grammar. The addition of a letter or syllable to the beginning of a word. […] 1553 T. Wilson Arte of Rhetorique iii. f. 94, Prosthesis. Of Addition. As thus. ‘He did all to berattle hym. Wherein appereth that a sillable is added to this vorde’ (rattle) […]

  2. a. The replacement of defective or absent parts of the body by artificial substitutes […] 1706 Phillips’s New World of Words […] In Surgery Prosthesis is taken for that which fills up what is wanting, as is to be seen in fistulous and hollow Ulcers, filled up with Flesh by that Art: Also the making of artificial Legs and Arms, when the natural ones are lost.

    (OED, s. v. ‘prosthesis’)

If we go back far enough, we find that the first acts of civilization were the use of tools […]. With every tool man is perfecting his own organs, whether motor or sensory, or is removing the limits to their functioning […]. By means of spectacles he corrects defects in the lens of his own eye […]. Writing was in its origin the voice of an absent person […]. Man has, as it were, become a kind of prosthetic God. When he puts on all his auxiliary organs he is truly magnificent; but those organs have not grown on to him and they still give him much trouble at times.11. Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, trans. Joan Riviere (London: The Hogarth Press, 1963), pp. 27–9.

(Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents)

A rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological, aesthetic mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent: definitions and accounts of prosthesis turn repeatedly on the absences signalled by these ‘auxiliary organs’. Figured in prosthetic terms, the study of pre-modern prosthesis registers as an absence to which contemporary critical discourse gestures. In his seminal, cross-period study, Prosthesis, David Wills locates the Reformation as a moment of prosthetic ‘reformation’ that creates the technological, rhetorical and philosophical conditions for one type of beginning for prosthesis, marked also by the appearance of the word in Thomas Wilson’s 1553 text The Arte of Rhetorique.22. David Wills, Prosthesis (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995), pp. 219–20.View all notes And yet, as Freud’s allusion to ‘the first tools of civilization’ as prostheses suggests, this figure has a much deeper, further reaching history. This special issue brings together scholars working on medieval and early modern literature and culture in order to reconsider that history and its implications for contemporary critical responses to prosthesis.Recent scholarship across a number of disciplines has given weight to the term ‘prosthesis’ as a tool of analysis with a variety of applications: it can characterise the act of literary and cultural criticism, or the effects of literature and the reading process, and it provides a means to articulate histories and experiences of disability.

3. For example, Wills, Prosthesis; David T. Mitchell and Sharon L. Snyder, Narrative Prosthesis: Disability and the Dependencies of Discourse (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000); Marquard Smith and Joanne Morra (eds.), The Prosthetic Impulse: From a Posthuman Present to a Biocultural Future (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006). Prosthesis is productive for literary and disability studies in particular because it invites us to explore the intersection between language and material, embodied and imagined worlds. These explorations, however, often consider prosthesis from the perspective of (technological, rhetorical and philosophical) conditions – heart transplants, bionic limbs, the novel, cyborgs, the virtual reality of a digital age – understood to be unavailable to the pre-modern. Essays in this volume seek to redress this imbalance in our critical discourse by examining prosthesis in its pre-modern contexts and showing that the significance of this figure for medieval and early modern writers extends far beyond its reach as a grammatical term.44. More work still needs to be done on the history of the word ‘prosthesis’. We are grateful to Rick Godden for bringing to our attention the forthcoming contribution to this history by Brandon Hawk, ‘Prosthesis: From Grammar to Medicine in the Earliest History of the Word’. We ask how medieval and early modern examples can challenge our assumptions about what prosthesis is and does. Can we consider prosthesis as ‘process’, always acting, always becoming? What literary, linguistic, technological or performative practices constitute prosthetic action? How do prostheses act on and orient or construct bodies, selves and communities? Does prosthesis heal, protect, reconstruct and connect, or does it expose corporeal vulnerability and the limits of language and embodied experience? How, in turn, do medieval and early modern representations of prosthesis shape or challenge assumptions about normative bodies and bodily integrity? Does pre-modern prosthesis, in all its iterations, figure sameness or difference? Asking these questions in historical context, we show that medieval and early modern prosthesis offers to speak to – and maybe even re-assemble – our present-day discourse on this subject.

Content

Foreword, Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter & Margaret Healy, Pages: 1205-1207

Prosthesis and reformation: the Black Rubric and the reinvention of kneeling, Isabel Davis, Pages: 1209-1231

Wearing powerful words and objects: healing prosthetics, Margaret Healy, Pages: 1233-1251

Literary genre, medieval studies, and the prosthesis of disability, Julie Orlemanski, Pages: 1253-1272

Prosthetic ecologies: vulnerable bodies and the dismodern subject in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Richard H. Godden, Pages: 1273-1290

Prosthetic encounter and queer intersubjectivity in The Merchant of Venice, Allison P. Hobgood, Pages: 1291-1308

‘Happy, and without a name’: prosthetic identities on the early modern stage, Naomi Baker, Pages: 1309-1326

Prosthesis and the performance of beginnings in The Woman in the Moon, Chloe Porter, Pages: 1327-1344

Fragments for a medieval theory of prosthesis, Katie L. Walter, Pages: 1345-1363

 

Find more info and all articles on the journal’s website

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici