Archives par mot-clé : Cultural history

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

 

Friday, May 12 – Evening Events
Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
=> Valley II, LeFevre Lounge Business Meeting

 

Friday 10 AM

214 – BERNHARD 210

Landscape Approaches to the Plague

Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
1. Michelle Ziegler – Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
2. Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln – 44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in
England and Its Implications for Future Research
3. Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville – Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague

 

Saturday 10 AM
345 – VALLEY III ELDRIDGE 309
Piers Plowman and Disability
Sponsor: International Piers Plowman Society
Organizer: Curtis Gruenler, Hope College
Presider: Curtis Gruenler
1. Dana Roders, Purdue Univ. – Intersections of Disability and Sin in Piers Plowman
2. Laura Godfrey, Univ. of Connecticut – Must I Here-Wel to Do-Wel? Sensory Impairments in Piers Plowman
3. Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Dismodern Will

 

Saturday 10 AM
393 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Fair Unknowns (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Arthuriana
Organizer: Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ./Arthuriana
Presider: Dorsey Armstrong,
1. Joseph M. Sullivan, Univ. of Oklahoma – What’s So Interesting About Fair Unknown Romances in Germanic Arthurian Literatures?
2. Kevin J. Harty, La Salle Univ. – Rescued from the Archives: The Fair Unknown on CBS TV in 1951: Mr. I. Magina-tion’s “Sir Gareth, Knight of the Round Table”
3. Christopher A. Snyder, Mississippi State Univ. – Jay Gatsby as the Fair Unknown: Arthurian Resonances in Fitzgerald
4. Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton – (Dis)abling the Fair Unknown: Disability and Gender in Malory’s “Alexander the Orphan”
5. Ryan Naughton, Arizona State Univ.  – Natural Nobility and Fair Unknowns

 

Saturday 10:30 PM
 436 – BERNHARD 158
Space, Place, and Disability (A Panel Discussion)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton
1. Julie Paulson, San Francisco State Univ. – “Fooles that Goon in Goddis Weys”: Mental Disability and Moral Personhood in Late Medieval Literature
2. Danielle Allor, Rutgers Univ.  – “Mobile as Wishes”: Disability, Intersubjectivity, and Community in the Liber confortatorius
3. Leah Pope, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison – The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place: Death and the Embodied Anglo-Saxon Subject
4. Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College – Disability in the Village: Household Care in Late Medieval France

 

Sunday 8:30 AM
527 – BERNHARD 158
Medievalism and Disability (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider :John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
1. Jess Genevieve Bailey, Univ. of California–Berkeley – Urs Graf ’s Daughter Courage: Violence and Disability in Late Medieval Europe
2. Christopher Baswell, Barnard College – A Visual Database for Medieval Disability
3. Tirumular Narayanan, California State Univ.–Chico – Impaired in Camelot: An Analysis of Ableism in Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant
4. Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ. – Trope or Truth? Medievalism and the Ubiquity of Disability
5. Elizabeth Wawrzyniak, Marquette Univ.  – Life Was Like That: The Grotesque Medieval in the Modern Imagination

 

Sunday 10:30 AM

556 – SCHNEIDER 1325
Gray Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders
Organizer: Deborah Thorpe, Univ. of York
Presider: Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College
1. Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. – Treatment of Learning Disabilities and Other Mental Health Issues in Medieval English Medicine and Law
2. Agnes Karpinski, Univ. des Saarlandes  – Madness, Nightmares, Melancholy: Exceptional Mental States in Medieval Com-
mentaries on Aristotle’s De somno
3. Eliza Buhrer, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Attention and Distraction in Medieval Thought

 

 

Full program of the Medieval congress here

News ! New serie editor – Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity – MIP University Press–Arc Humanities Press

Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Geographical Scope

Unrestricted

Chronological Scope

Late Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern

Series advisory board

  • Elizabeth B. Bearden (University of Wisconsin)
  • Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University)
  • Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University)
  • Richard H. Godden (Louisiana State University)
  • Maria Fabricius Hansen (University of Copenhagen)
  • Virginia A. Krause (Brown University)
  • Jennifer Spinks (University of Melbourn)
  • Debra Higgs Strickland (University of Glasgow)
  • Wes Williams (University of Oxford)

Series editors

  • Kathleen Perry Long (Cornell University, USA)
  • Luke Morgan (Monash University, Australia)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

[About them : MIP offers rapid turn-around times, the newest digital policies (including full Open Access compliance), and global distribution. In North America books can be purchased through ISD and in Europe and the rest of the world through NBN International.]

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici

Call for Papers – ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages – IMC Leeds

‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages

International Medieval Congress University of Leeds 3rd – 6th July 2017

Conference Details

The International Medieval Congress is the largest interdisciplinary medieval conference of its kind – attracting over 2,200 attendees from over 50 countries, and boasting approximately 1,700 individual papers within 580 academic sessions. Every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which, for 2017, is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch. For further information on the Congress, see: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html 

Session Details

**Should this session attract enough interest it will become a three-part series, with each session focussing more deeply on the individual themes of death, disability and disease. Within late-medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying), disabilities and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death, disability and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying, diseased or disabled). It will hope to consider the contradictory nature of female disease and disability which both engendered an elevated sense of holiness and, conversely, a sense of physical monstrosity; the female response to death, disability and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death, disease and disability dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity? We welcome multi-disciplinary papers from all geographical locations, c.1300-c.1500, which engage with themes such as (but not limited to): representations of death, disease and/or (dis)ability; literature either for or by women dealing with the themes of death, disease and/or disability; the tradition of Memento Mori and/or the Danse Macabre; the gendering of ‘Death’ ; the Black Death’s impact on traditional gender roles; obstetric death; female piety and holy anorexia; the effect of chronic disease and/or disability on late-medieval constructions of masculinity; women and disease (as the developers of cures, writers of recipes, carers or patients, etc.); female use of disability aids and/or prosthetics; and self-inflicted disfigurement.

Submission Guidelines

Please send a paper title and an abstract of 100-200 words to Rachael Gillibrand at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (hy11rg@leeds.ac.uk) by 23rd September 2016.

New Publication – Fools and idiots? Intellectual disability in the Middle Ages by Irina Metzler

Fools and idiots?

 

  • Format: Hardcover
  • ISBN: 978-0-7190-9636-5
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Price: £70.00
  • Published Date: February 2016
  • BIC Category: History, History of medicine, History & Archaeology, European history: medieval period, middle ages, CE period up to c 1500, HISTORY / Medieval, Medicine / History of medicine, Humanities / Medieval history, MEDICAL / History

 

Fools and idiots? is the first book devoted to the cultural history in the pre-modern period of people we now describe as having learning disabilities. Using an interdisciplinary approach, including historical semantics, medicine, natural philosophy and law, Irina Metzler considers a neglected field of social and medical history and makes an original contribution to the problem of a shifting concept such as ‘idiocy’.

Medieval physicians, lawyers and the schoolmen of the emerging universities wrote the texts which shaped medieval definitions of intellectual ability and its counterpart, disability. In studying such texts, which form part of our contemporary scientific and cultural heritage, we gain a better understanding of which people were considered to be intellectually disabled, and how their participation and inclusion in society differed from the situation today. This book will be required reading for anyone studying or working in disability studies, history of medicine, social history and the history of ideas.

 

Contents

1. Pre-/conceptions: problems of definition and historiography
2. From morio to fool: semantics of intellectual disability
3. Cold complexions and moist humors: natural science and intellectual disability
4. The infantile and the irrational: mind, soul and intellectual disability
5. Non-consenting adults: laws and intellectual disability
6. Fools, pets and entertainers: socio-cultural considerations of intellectual disability
7. Reconsiderations: rationality, intelligence and human status
Select bibliography
Index

More informations on the editor website

 

CFP – Wounding and Caring: Vulnerable Bodies in Narrative at the American Comparative Literature Association – Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands July 6-9, 2017.

Seminar – Wounding and Caring: Vulnerable Bodies in Narrative at the American Comparative Literature Association – Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands July 6-9, 2017.

Organizer: Andreea Marculescu

Co-Organizer: Amit Baishya

 

Vulnerability is a key term in a strand of recent feminist scholarship (Adriana Cavarero, Judith Butler, Rosalyn Diprose, Kelly Oliver, Ann Murphy). Vulnerability is not defined here as a temporary situation specific to certain subjects; rather, as Butler points out in Frames of War, it is a condition of social life, one where the subject is exposed to forms of violence that she cannot anticipate or pre-empt. In this sense, vulnerability is intrinsic to definitions of the “human” and captures the subject in intersubjective relations with a host of (unknown and, possibly, unknowable) others. Consideration of vulnerability entails, thus, both the recognition of one’s own dependency on others and the designing of collective mechanisms and frameworks of care for bodies. Furthermore, following the etymological root of the word vulnerability (the Latin vulnus), Cavarero underlines that this category designates a susceptibility to both wounding and caring. As a wounded body, the subject is unilaterally exposed to pain and suffering. The subject afflicted by such violence is trapped in the reality of her own suffering; she cannot step away or fight against the infliction of suffering upon her. Yet, this suffering body can also be cared for by others.

 

Therefore, while the risk of violence done by the other is a crucial factor in the analysis of vulnerability, frames of care that recognize the existence of particular vulnerable bodies should also be part of the critical discourse about the ethical and ontological status of precarious subjects. Indeed, external socio-political frameworks are crucial in validating which subjects can be placed (or not) under the category of vulnerability. Hence the need, according to Butler, for the introduction of a term such as « grievability »—the condition of possibility that determines whether a life is encompassed within the frames of vulnerability, risk and precariousness. « Wounding, » « caring, » « grievability, » and « responsibility » become, therefore, key terms that must be critically elaborated in tracing the physico-emotional profile of vulnerable bodies and also the recognition of their socio-cultural value.

 

Keeping these insights in mind, this seminar seeks to discuss the narrative production, valuation and circulation of vulnerable bodies belonging to different historical, social and political contexts. As we mentioned above, vulnerability should be understood as a shared condition that places us in relationships of dependence and linkage to others. We would like to initiate a transhistorical and cross-cultural discussion about the representation of vulnerable bodies in the dual sense outlined above in this seminar.

Contact the Seminar Organizers

Submit a paper for this seminar.

CFP – Sponsored Panel on « Gendered Experiences of Pain » at 52nd – ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

CfP – Sponsored Panel on « Gendered Experiences of Pain » at 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 2017

Panel title: “Everybody’s (Gender) Hurts: Gendered Experiences of Pain”

Sponsored by: Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship

Conference: 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, (MI, USA), 11-14 May, 2017

 

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects (e.g. Boddice 2014; Cohen et al 2012; Davies 2014; Morris 1991; Moscoso 2012).  Academics and scientist-clinicians have demonstrated that the experience of pain is highly gendered (see e.g. Bendelow 1993; Bernardes et al 2014; Hoffmann and Tarzian 2001). For example, the severity of women’s pain is often less readily accepted by medics. Women in pain are more likely to be dismissed as attention-seeking or suffering from psycho-somatic conditions than men. Painful conditions that affect many women, such as endometriosis, are woefully under-studied.

Medievalists have also analysed pain, including its’ gendered dimension, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress (see e.g. Cohen 1995, 2000, 2010; Easton 2002; Mills 2005; Mowbray, 2009). In particular, Caroline Walker Bynum’s ground-breaking feminist scholarship (see e.g. 1988, 1992) has shown the specific ways in which medieval holy women harnessed ascetic suffering as forms of empowering worship praxes.

This panel will examine the gendered experience of pain in the medieval period, engaging with, and moving beyond, the limited context of holy women established by Bynum. It will dissect the ways in which men and women experienced — or were understood to experience — pain differerently, to elucidate the wider framework of gender-specific suffering in the period. The subjective experiences of medieval men and women in pain will be unearthed, allowing their marginalised voices to add context and further urgency to contemporary debates about inadequate medical care for modern men and women in pain.

 

Relevant questions for this session include:

· How are the pains of  “women’s complaints” — including menstruation and childbirth — depicted, and understood in the medieval era? Are other forms of physical discomfort coded as predominantly feminineeven if they have no direct biological link to womanhood? Are there similar “male” forms of pain?

· How are men and women socialised differently to understand, to contextualise, and ultimately to experience their pain? How do men and women express their pain? And share their pain with those around them? Are specific patterns of lexis, imagery, or metaphor routinely used by either men and women, or both?

· What differences can we observe between the ways in which men and women in pain are treated by medical practitioners, the religious community, and their families? What was the contemporary rationale for classifying and treating men and women’s pain differently? As a counterpoint: what similarities are there in the treatment of pain for men and women? Does the pain experience ever unite suffering men and women as a cohesive group, a group in which pain — and not genderis the most important identity marker?
If you’re interested in speaking on this panel, please submit the following documents to the panel organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] qmul.ac.uk), by 15 September 2017:

1) One-page abstract

2) Completed Participant Information Form (downloadable in .pdf and Word format from the Conference website)
N.B. Conference regulations stipulate that speakers may only present on one panel each year at Kalamazoo. As such, we cannot consider papers from individuals who have already submitted abstract proposals to other sessions at the conference. Nevertheless, if a paper submission is not selected for the “Gendered Experiences of Pain” panel, we will forward the submission to the Conference organisers for potential inclusion in a General Session.

View this CfP online , via @aspencerhall

 

CFP – Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – L’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel – 11  au 14 mai 2017

 

Le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale et l’International Medieval Society-Paris lancent un appel à communication pour une session de communications organisée dans le cadre de l’International Congress on Medieval Studies qui se déroulera à Kalamazoo (USA) du 11  au 14 mai 2017 et qui réunit tous les ans dans le Michigan plus de 3000 médiévistes venus du monde entier. Cet appel conjoint est l’occasion pour le CESCM d’organiser pour la première fois un événement scientifique lors de l’ICMS,  sur le thème de l’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel.

Les propositions de communication (CV et résumé) sont à adresser à Vincent Debiais avant le 15 septembre 2016 ; merci aussi de renseigner la fiche d’inscription de l’ICMS. Pour tout renseignement, contacter Vincent Debiais : vincent.debiais@univ-poitiers.fr

Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

This session will explore new avenues of research on visual signs marking the identity of social, religious, and political groups in different spaces (real or imaginary), and the ways in which these groups distinguished themselves.  Recent advances in the auxiliary sciences, which take into account social phenomena in the origin, creation and usage of systems of signs, permit  to revisit questions posed by emblems, armor, inscriptions, and images that mark the landscape and establish hierarchical spaces, both separate and connected.  In the dialectic of inclusion/exclusion, signs become references of identity included, integrated, claimed or rejected in reaction to historical circumstances and power relations.  This session brings together specialists from different disciplines to explore how visual signs work in real spaces, such as cities, monasteries, and castles; and literary spaces where such signs appear frequently in motifs and narratives.

This session welcomes interdisciplinary submissions.  Scholars working on original approaches to signs of identity through social history, visual culture, and the auxiliary sciences are encouraged to submit abstracts.  In this way, the session will have very broad appeal to participants at Kalamazoo.  Possible themes are: disputes, divisions, and heraldic claims; banners, standards, and flags; epigraphic marking and destruction; the role of written culture/visual culture in the strength of social groups.

 

Voir l’appel sur les carnets du CESCM