Archives par mot-clé : Body history

Conference – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages at UCL -29th september

‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages

 

Début : Sep 29, 2017 09:00 AM
Fin : Sep 29, 2017 07:00 PM

Emplacement IAS Common Ground, Ground Floor, South Wing, Wilkins Building

 

Pain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.

The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It brings together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

Relevant topics for this conference include:

-Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works
-Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them -Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives -Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity -Chronic pain and/as disability -The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another -The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain -The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

Keynote address:

Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address: ‘What is Chronic Pain in a Non-Neural Age? Working Definitions, Sources, and Methodologies’.

Confirmed speakers:

-Dr Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and the Saintly Bishop in Medieval England’
-Dr James McKinstry (Durham University, UK), ‘Headaches, Diseases, and Old Age: William Dunbar’s Diagnosis of Chronic Pain’
-Dr Michele Moatt (National Trust and Lancaster University, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and Prophecy in the Twelfth-century Life of Aelred of Rievaulx
-Catherine Coffey (Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland), ‘“Mit zwoelf tugenden stritet si wider das vleisch”: The Body Fighting the Flesh in Mechthild von Magdeburg’s Das fließende Licht der Gottheit
-Katherine Briant (Fordham University, New York, USA), ‘Pain as a Theological Framework in Julian of Norwich’s Vision and Revelation
-Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern University, Switzerland), ‘Mary’s Perpetual Physical Pain: Affective Piety and “Doubling”’
-Prof Wendy J Turner (Augusta University, Georgia, USA), ‘Mental Complications of Pain: Age and Violence in Medieval England’
-Dr Bianca Frohne (University of Bremen, Germany), ‘Living With Pain: Constructions of a Corporeal Experience in Early and High Medieval Miracle Accounts’
-Dr William Maclehose (University College London, UK), ‘A Locus for Healing: Saints’ Shrines and Representations of Chronic Pain’

Bursaries for attendance:

This conference is generously supported by the Society for the Social History of Medicine. As such, members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine may apply for bursaries to facilitate attendance. We encourage all eligible parties to apply. Please see here for full details.

SSHM Logo

Registration:

-Please register here.
-The conference registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars), though all attendees must register for the conference.
-The registration fee covers refreshments throughout the day for attendees, including tea and coffee at breaks, a sandwich lunch, and a wine reception. If you have any dietary requirements, please list these when you confirm your attendance.
Registration closes on 1st August 2017.

How to get to the conference:

-For details as to how to get to UCL on public transport, please see here.
-Please enter UCL through the gates at the Front Lodges on Gower Street (marked by the big red pin in the map below). This entrance offers the most direct route to the workshop location.
-The workshop takes place in the Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS), University College London, UK. We will be in the room Common Ground which is on the Ground Floor of the South Wing in the Wilkins Building. There is a variety of seating types available for attendees in this room. We will also have a QuietRoom (the Council Room G12) available for attendees to rest and take a break, located directly opposite Common Ground.
-Please follow the route as shown in the map below to reach Common Ground from the Front Lodges. This route is wheelchair accessible.
-To consult the disabledgo.com Access Guide for the Wilkins Building, please see here. Accessible bathroom facilities are available directly next to Common Ground, and also on the Lower Ground floor (by lift).

Common Ground Map

If you have any queries, including access requirements, please do not hesitate to contact the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk).

This conference contributes to the ‘Sense and Sensation’ research strand at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies. This strand also comprises a Reading Group focused on chronic pain. To join the Reading Group, please email the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk).

More info on the UCL website.

CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Desire, Disability, Disorder at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

Desire, Disability, Disorder

Organizer: Matthew Giancarlo, University of Kentucky (matthew.giancarlo@uky.edu)

This session will explore the intersection of forms of disability with artistic and legal discourses about desire and social order: erotic, familial, political. How is “disability” framed as both limiting and enabling, as seen from different speaking positions? What kind of alternative orders are visible from —or lisible through— “disordered” bodies? How does the imaginative representation of a handicap either fulfill or frustrate different kinds of desires? These questions and others will be considered, from different historical perspectives and in light of the growing body of research on medieval disability and the law. Paper proposals dealing with specific authors and texts are encouraged.

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

CFP – Representations of the Body in Saga Literature – ICMS Kzoo 2018

Representations of the Body in Saga Literature

For ICMS at Western Michigan University – Kalamazoo, MI – May 10-13, 2018

The New England Saga Society is delighted to once again offer a panel for those interested in Old Norse literature, history, and culture. We are currently seeking proposals for our sponsored session, “Representations of the Body in Saga Literature,” a panel that will explore the ways in which bodies and corporeality are constructed and represented in saga literature.

The body is an object upon which culture writes itself. It is the site of definition and re-definition as it witnesses history, moves through time and space, and is shaped by social, political, and cultural phenomena. Understanding how medieval audiences viewed the body and participated in the social construction of the body as object is essential to a better appreciation of medieval ideations of the human condition. We are interested in cultural, ideological, and literary investigations of the experience of embodiment in medieval Scandinavia and the representation of this experience in literature, art, philosophy, ethics, law, theology, and science.

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

body-mind dichotomy
ideological constructions of the body
ableness and disability
the monstrous
gender and sexuality
illness, death, and dismemberment
body-soul dichotomy
pagan vs. Christian bodies
queer theory
medicine
medical transformations of the body
body as landscape
images of bodies

Brief (200-300 word) proposals are welcome anytime before September 15, 2017. Please e-mail abstracts to either of the organizers:

Andrew Pfrenger (apfrenge@kent.edu)

John P. Sexton (john.sexton@bridgew.edu)

CFP – The Old and the Young: Medieval Bodies Ignored – ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

The Old and the Young:
Medieval Bodies Ignored

Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 1043 2018

These sessions will concentrate upon the experiences and bodies of the old and the young, Recognising that the medieval normative body (male,
middle aged and white) has influenced the way we look at the MA, the intention of these sessions is to highlight the experiences of children and the elderly which are outside the boundaries of said norm. Furthermore, we wish to gain a greater understanding of how other factors (gender, race, ability, wealth, bodily status, power) intersect with and impact upon the experiences of elderly and young people. While medieval childhood studies is by no means a neglected field, historiography has recently turned away from a ‘panhistorical and essentialist’ child-centric model. This allows us to examine the experiences of a child within culturally specific contexts in which it might be neglected, abandoned or dismissed. Meanwhile, the old are often marginalised in scholarship, within the medieval discourse and in our lived reality. The hope is that by examining their experiences in concert with one another, we will be able to build up a clearer understanding of the lived experience of the old and the young in the Middle Ages.

Intersectional, interdisciplinary abstracts would be particularly welcomed.
Possible Topics Include:
‘ Specific historical experiences of being young and old
‘ Body as physical entity and as a site of rhetoric
‘ Dual nature of body: site of discourse and identity
‘ Descriptions of old and young bodies

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15- to 20-minute paper as well as a Participant Information Form to medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com by September 15, 2017.

 

CFP – Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War – IMC Leeds 2018

Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War

International Medieval Congress – Leeds
July 2018

During conflicts, bodies and minds are subjected to injury. Although a truism, this aspect of the experience of medieval warfare is somewhat underexplored. Recent studies of wounds and wounding and the incidence and experience of sickness during military campaigns have begun to focus attention on how medieval combatants and non-combatants suffered bodily and mental damage in times of war. At the same time, new work has put this experience in a medical context, examining contemporary sources to see how the experience of infirmity in times of war was recorded and interpreted by observers in the medieval medical framework of humoralism. However, there is scope for further investigation across the whole medieval period, and in particular on the experience of the incapacitated as recipients of bodily, psychological, medical and spiritual care.

 

The experience of the injured, sick, and incapacitated is one half of any medical history; the identity and practice of those who offer care to them is the other half. The role of carer is a complex one. Carers might have significant knowledge of nursing or medicine, or be thrust into the role of carer by circumstance. They may experience physical and emotional labour in offering care to the incapacitated, and need care themselves. Recent work on the history of medical practitioners shows us that we should look beyond those identified as ‘medics’ in contemporary to fully understand the landscape of medical care in the Middle Ages, but such pluralistic approaches have not yet been fully exploited, nor applied to the context of care in warfare.

It is the aim of these proposed sessions to explore the role, agency, behaviour, and subjective experience of recipients and givers of care in times of warfare throughout the whole medieval period, taking in the early, central and later Middle Ages. Submissions from an interdisciplinary background are particularly welcomed, including, but not limited to, work on narrative texts, literary works, documentary records, artistic sources, religious texts and others. Geographical and linguistic scope is not limited. Proposals will be considered for inclusion in a possible publication.

Topics for discussion could include:
• The identity of caregivers, both formal and informal
• The identity of those requiring care
• Care of the wounded and care of the sick
• Gendered aspects of giving and receiving care
• Transportation of the sick, wounded, incapacitated
• Treatment of the dead
• Caring for enemies, or prisoners of war
• Physical and psychological care
• Spiritual care
• The depiction of care in literary or artistic sources
• The care of injured, incapacitated or disabled combatants
and non-combatants
• The care of animals in a military context
• The relationship between nursing and medical
care/treatment
• The absence of care

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be directed, to J.Phillips@leeds.ac.uk by 04 September 2017.

More info on Academia.edu

CFP – IMC Leeds – Medieval Bodies Ignored

Medieval Bodies Ignored
CfP IMC 2018: Deadline 31St August 2017

Since Caroline Walker Bynum’s 1995 article ‘Why All the Fuss
About the Body?’, the discussion around bodies as historical
bodies has flourished. In these sessions, the intent is to pick out,
from ‘the cacophony of discourses’ that medieval people used to
discuss the body, a few of the notes that are sometimes
overlooked. Discussion post—Caroline Walker Bynum has often
focused on the human body, but her work has also opened up a
wider examination of the ways in which non —human bodies were
conceptualised. Non-human animals, environmental bodies and
socio-political bodies are all discussed in relation to humans and
the non-human body. Equally, humans could also be discussed in
relation to non-human bodies, either in a positive or a derogatory
sense. These sessions will explore how human and non-human
bodies have influenced each other during the Middle Ages and in
scholarship. By examining these seemingly separate discourses in
concert with one another the impact of ideas around
embodiment upon the study of the Middle Ages is revealed and parallels and connections can be exploited.

Themes

‘ Discourses around human and non-human animal bodies:
scientific, literary, juridico—legal.

‘ Concepts of environmental bodies: bodies of water,
geological and geographical bodies, human / non—human
geography.

‘ Political and social bodies: the body politic, the politicised
body, guilds and professional bodies, military bodies.

 

The deadline for 200 – 300 word abstracts is 31st August 2017. Please email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com. And follow them on Twitter: @BodiesIgnored

 

Roundtable – #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

#disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a bring your own lunch affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success, and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network. We are now moving into more official outlets for discussion, and are putting together a Roundtable for IMC 2018.

We invite abstracts for 5 minute talks as part of a roundtable discussion about accessibility in Higher Education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness and mental health to name but a few. Papers might address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, or pinpoint an issue that needs addressing.

Please send an abstract of no more than 150 words outlining your talk to alexralee12@gmail.com by August 20th [deadline extended : 15 september !]

CFP – Interiority and Alterity- Hortulus Journal – Fall 2017

Call for Papers: Fall 2017 Themed Issue, “Interiority and Alterity”

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed, peer-reviewed, and born-digital journal devoted to the culture, literature, history, and society of the medieval past. Published semi-annually, the journal collects exceptional examples of work by graduate students on a number of themes, disciplines, subjects, and periods of medieval studies. We also welcome book reviews of monographs published or re-released in the past five years that are of interest to medievalists. For the Fall issue we are particularly interested in reviews of books which fall under the current special topic.

Interiority refers to personal emotions, ideals, and beliefs in addition to self-reflection and inner consciousness. Recent scholarship in Cultural Studies asks how these elements of interiority may impact upon culture more broadly, and the extent to which culture impacts interiority. With alterity we refer not only to the state of being ‘other’ or different, but also to the study of how this difference is created. Within the framework of such study a mutual interrogation between center and periphery remains critical in order to prevent a reproduction of cycles of hegemony. In this context, the concepts of interiority and alterity both complement and contrast with each other: to echo Iain Chambers (himself echoing Heidegger), we refer to what unfolds towards us and away from us, to what both envelopes and exceeds us (“Signs of Silence, Lines of Listening”, The Postcolonial Question: Common Skies, Divided Horizons ed. I. Chambers and L. Curti, pp. 47-63 at p. 54).

For our Fall 2017 themed issue we invite proposals that critically engage with the concepts of interiority and alterity, both as separate concepts and in relation to each other. We hope to attract articles offering comparative and multidisciplinary perspectives, and welcome contributions from the fields of history, art history, literary scholarship, archeology, anthropology, or any other discipline that will contribute to our thinking about the application of these concepts and their broader theoretical contexts in the medieval period. We are particularly interested in submissions that take a more methodology-focused approach and those which engage with the materiality of interiority and alterity in the Middle Ages. Hortulus additionally suggests that contributors familiarize themselves with the current scholarship surrounding the use of the terms ‘Otherness’ and alterity.

Contributions should be in English and roughly 6,000–12,000 words, including all documentation and citational apparatus; book reviews are typically between 500-1,000 words but cannot exceed 2,000. All notes must be endnotes, and a bibliography must be included; submission guidelines can be found here. Contributions may be submitted to hortulus[at]hortulus-journal[dot]com and are due 25 September 2017. If you are interested in submitting a paper but feel you would need additional time, please send a query email and details about an expected time-scale for your submission. Queries about submissions or the journal more generally can also be sent to this address.

More on the Hortulus Journal website

CFP – ‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion. Possible subjects include but are not restricted to:

  • Concepts of the eye within scientific, medical, theological or cultural texts and images
  • Vision in relation to the other senses
  • Testing vision
  • Experiences of sight loss, total and partial
  • Restoring and regaining vision
  • Eye loss: stigma and disfigurement
  • Eye contact, staring and social interaction
  • Adornments to the eye: cosmetics, masks, vision aids and prosthetics
  • Visual and literary representations of the eye
  • Challenges to ableist narratives relating to sight loss and visual impairment.

‌The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers. Proposals of no more than 200 words, together with the name and institutional affiliation of the speaker should be sent to Gemma Almond at gemma.almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or 655580@swansea.ac.uk. The closing date for submissions is 1st December 2017.

RIAH branding - long

The workshop is convened by Professor David Turner, Swansea University and PhD candidate Gemma Almond, Swansea University and the Science Museum, London.

More info on the effaces history project.

 

Erin Connelly on Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections at the Library of Congress

 

Erin Connelly discussed her research involving the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, combined with a severely stalled discovery pipeline for new antibiotics.

Speaker Biography: Erin Connelly is the CLIR-Mellon Fellow for Data Curation in medieval studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts (Penn Libraries).

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe