Archives par mot-clé : Attitudes and behaviour

CFP – The Worlds that plague made – NYU Medieval and Renaissance Center – 13-14 april 2018

More info on the organisator website.

CFP – Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, April 12-15.

CFP for Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, NV April 12-15.

Organised by Medieval Association of the Pacific, the Rocky Mountain Medieval and the Renaissance Association

Medieval and early modern societies defined monstrosity in a multitude of ways, assigning the term to figures representing the supernatural “other” and to those representing human alterities. Monsters filled the national consciousness of societies throughout the medieval and early modern worlds. Indeed, the monster became an allegory for a society’s relativisms and fears. So, what happens when the monster is the monarch him or herself—or when the monster is a member of the royal family? How might the term be defined differently or specifically for the sake of this unique person? What special circumstances might be attached to the term and its parameters when the monarch and his or her relationship to the State and its people is concerned? Monarchs of the medieval and early modern periods were deeply concerned about their legacies, and prioritized the public memory of their reigns and dynasties very highly. Similarly, literary and artistic representations of royalty and monarchs often showcase the concerns of dynasty, heredity, and reputation. How is public memory affected when the monarch, or a member of a royal dynasty, is remembered as monstrous for posterity? Moreover, how is royal legacy affected when the term “monster” becomes attached to the monarch while he or she is still living?

MEARCSTAPA invites proposals in all disciplines of the humanities and for all nations, regions, language groups, and cultures of the medieval and early modern periods globally. Please send proposals of 250 words maximum to Asa Mittman asmittman@csuchico.edu, Thea Tomaini tmtomaini@gmail.com, and Ilan Mitchell-Smith Ilan.mitchellsmith@csulb.edu by 14 November 2017.

CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

 

Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages

Organizers: Molly Lewis, George Washington University (mclewis@email.gwu.edu); Arthur Russell, Case Western Reserve University (ajr171@case.edu)

Appeals to smell, taste, see, hear, and touch go a long way to define medieval senses of self and other. In the Middle English Siege of Jerusalem (ca. 1370-1380), for instance, the stench of Jewish corpses “choke” ditches to the horror of Jewish survivors and to the delight of Christian spectators. The sound of the blacksmith’s hammer striking an anvil, as imagined in “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths” (ca. 1275-1300), somehow transmits the color of his blackened skin and the nuisance of his socioeconomic status across great distances. What do we do with works, such as the Siege of Jerusalem and the “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths,” that negatively consume its sensing figures and, by extension, its readers? What is gained in and through these literary assaults on the senses? What are the ends of medieval sensation? How are medieval and modern readers taught to perceive differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability?

Sensory studies often make positive use of the senses, in so far as the senses enable modern audiences to have deeper and more significant encounters with past cultures, histories, and literatures. For all the positive sensations we recognize, medieval senses were just as often engaged in and by art and literature to inculcate difference, justify brutality, and/or cultivate sympathy. “Detecting Difference” invites participants to examine the various formations and capacities of the medieval sensorium to encode and enforce social (dis)orders, paying special attention to techniques for detecting differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability. The panel will build on recent work in the sensory, disability, and race studies—from Mark Smith’s How Race Was Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (2006) to the special issue of postmedieval, edited by Lara Farina and Holly Dugan on “The Intimate Senses” (2012)—to explore how medieval perceptions of difference speak to present-day conversations about difference, about cultures of surveillance, about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas.

Comment: Lara Farina, West Virginia University

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

CFP – Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Healing Charms and Medicine Harvard University, April 6-8, 2018

Charms (understood as ritual means of addressing situations of sickness, stress, and anxiety by way of a combination of special language and special actions) are universal across human societies. Early manuscripts in Latin and various vernacular languages contain several examples of healing charms that blur the lines between magic and science. Medical thinking informs literary production worldwide, from its ancient beginnings to modern times. In the present day, people routinely consult specialists in naturopathy, Ayurveda, and traditional Chinese medicine alongside, or in preference to, modern, scientific medicine.

Not only does the study of healing charms and other medical beliefs and practices have the potential to yield insight into traditional and historical systems of knowledge, but such study often has major implications for modern medicine. Charms can lead to the development of new medication and procedures, as when researchers from the University of Nottingham discovered that a charm from the 9th century Anglo Saxon manuscript “Bald’s Leechbook” proved effective in eradicating strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Pharmaceutical companies spend significant amount of money on researching the traditional pharmocopiae of indigenous cultures across the planet in order to develop new drugs.

Because of the broad nature of this topic, this conference aims to bring together researchers whose work spans a broad range of areas, time periods, and disciplinary approaches. The nature of this conference brings together the study of medicine, science, and religion, thereby bridging gaps between disciplines and uncovering connections between the traditions of various cultures.

 

The Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, with support from the Committee for the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities, is proud to host “Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Healing Charms and Medicine,” an interdisciplinary conference to be held at Harvard University from April 6-8, 2018, which aims to present innovative and cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of healing charms and medicine across a wide range of cultures and geographic areas, from antiquity up to the modern period.

Keynote speakers will be Dr. Jacqueline Borsje (University of Amsterdam) and Prof. Richard Kieckhefer (Northwestern University).

We invite proposals for papers on any aspect of the study of healing charms and traditional medicine, in any time period or location, from any disciplinary approach, including, but not limited to, folklore, history of science, medieval studies, religious studies, medicine, and anthropology.

Papers should be 20 minutes long, with a 10 minute period following the paper for questions. Proposals should include a title, an abstract of 200-300 words, and a short speaker biography, and should be sent to hcm@fas.harvard.edu. Please send submissions either in the body of the email or as an attached word document.

Abstracts due Tuesday October 25th, 2017

 

Mor info on the conference website.

CFP – CALL FOR PAPERS The Maladies, Miracles and Medicine of the Middle Ages, II. Places, Spaces and Objects – The Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading – Friday 23. March 2018

The Maladies, Miracles and Medicine of the Middle Ages, II. Places, Spaces and Objects

The Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading Friday 23. March 2018.

As medievalists, we access our period through the written records, sites, and items that survive in order to form a deeper understanding of the period, one that goes beyond the page or the ruinous buildings that remain today. Using a wide range of sources is particularly valuable when considering the miraculous and the medicinal. After all, it is not just the writings, but the spaces, places and objects of both healthcare and of the holy which can inform and shape our research, and than of understanding. Indeed, in many instances these two elements combine, as can be seen through the production of miracle cures, the monastic collections of medical treatises, and medieval hospitals and monastic infirmaries.
But, what can these sources tell us of miracles, of medicine, of maladies? How did the miraculous and the medicinal relate to and/or oppose each other? What can we learn of faith and the faithful, and of ill-health and healing? It is questions such as these which the second ‘Maladies, Miracles and Medicine’ conference considers by bringing together post-graduate and early-career researchers who work on all aspects of the healing and the holy. The conference welcomes papers on all aspects of this theme whether your interests lie in archaeology, art, literature, medicine and science, or miracles and theology (or a little bit of everything). Particular themes to consider are:

  • Pilgrims as ‘patients’ and miraculous medicine
  • Hospitals, hospices and infirmaries as places of cure and places of piety
  •  Objects of healing and/or objects of faith
  • Landscapes and locations of religion and remedy
  • The written word as place, space, or object of cure or of faith
  • Personal devotion and home-based healthcare

Proposals for twenty-minute papers fitting broadly into one of the above themes are welcomed from all post-graduate and early-career researchers before the deadline, 5. January 2018. Proposals of no more than 200 words, and further enquiries are to be sent to the organisers, Dr Ruth Salter and Frances Cook, via: gcms.reading@gmail.com. Please be aware that further details will be released closer to the date.

CFP – Leprosy and the Leper Reconsidered – McGill – Montreal, 20-22 September 2018

Leprosy and the Leper Reconsidered

Montreal, 20-22 September 2018

They are pleased to announce the call for papers for Leprosy and the Leper Reconsidered, which will take place at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. This is an interdisciplinary and trans-historical conference which seeks both to unite and to broaden the discourse on leprosy sufferers and leprosy. In this way, this conference aims to highlight and discuss the presence of leprosy not only across time, but also across physical borders and spaces. Indeed, this conference aims to erase such boundaries in order to foster a more encompassing discussion of such a global disease. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, there is a growing need to address leprosy within an interdisciplinary framework in order to expand our understanding of changing discourse, medical, social, and popular, surrounding the disease and the afflicted.

The conference will have plenary talks from Susan Burns (University of Chicago) and Luke Demaitre (University of Virginia).

They invite proposals for papers of approximately 20 minutes or posters that engage with the themes of leprosy sufferers, leprosy, and perceptions of the disease from various disciplinary approaches, such as history, literature, art history, archaeology, anthropology, bioarchaeology, material culture, or others. Possible topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Cultural responses to leprosy
  • Changing perceptions of leprosy
  • Religious understandings of leprosy
  • Colonial and Post-Colonial approaches to the regulation of leprosy sufferers
  • Leprosy in popular culture (e.g. books, film, etc.)
  • Physicians responses to leprosy
  • Missions and missionaries
  • The lexicon of leprosy
  • Material culture surrounding leprosy sufferers and medical responses to leprosy.

Those wishing to participate should please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, a brief bio and a one-page CV to leprosyandtheleper@gmail.com no later than 20 October 2017. They ask that you indicate whether you would like to be considered as a speaker or to present a poster. Please attach your documents as either a Microsoft Word or PDF file and include your name and home institution on all files. For further information please check their website or on Twitter.

CFP – IMC Leeds 2018 – Panel on Memory & Mental Health organised by Amsterdam University Press

Call for Papers — Leeds IMC, 2-5 July 2018 – Panel on Memory & Mental Health
Sponsor: Amsterdam University

Press Organizer: Tyler Clohertv,

Many medieval records in both medicine and law record individuals as « unfit » or « unhealthy » because of a lack of a good memory, often non bonam memoriam or some variation thereon. This panel seeks to address what exactly that phrase meant, how it might impair the person, and what implications it might hold in terms of health, wealth, legal standing, and/or inheritance. We seek papers on both historic persons and concepts as well as literary papers that might have characters that also reflect this dynamic. All fields of medieval history (roughly from 400-1600) are welcome.

Contact: Tyler Cloherty, t.cloherty@aup.n1 Due: September 15th Include: Name, Title (with a sentence or two explanation), affiliation, address, phone, email, and please indicate whether you are a student or a faculty member.

This session is sponsored by the AUP series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

CFP – Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War – IMC Leeds 2018

Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War

International Medieval Congress – Leeds
July 2018

During conflicts, bodies and minds are subjected to injury. Although a truism, this aspect of the experience of medieval warfare is somewhat underexplored. Recent studies of wounds and wounding and the incidence and experience of sickness during military campaigns have begun to focus attention on how medieval combatants and non-combatants suffered bodily and mental damage in times of war. At the same time, new work has put this experience in a medical context, examining contemporary sources to see how the experience of infirmity in times of war was recorded and interpreted by observers in the medieval medical framework of humoralism. However, there is scope for further investigation across the whole medieval period, and in particular on the experience of the incapacitated as recipients of bodily, psychological, medical and spiritual care.

 

The experience of the injured, sick, and incapacitated is one half of any medical history; the identity and practice of those who offer care to them is the other half. The role of carer is a complex one. Carers might have significant knowledge of nursing or medicine, or be thrust into the role of carer by circumstance. They may experience physical and emotional labour in offering care to the incapacitated, and need care themselves. Recent work on the history of medical practitioners shows us that we should look beyond those identified as ‘medics’ in contemporary to fully understand the landscape of medical care in the Middle Ages, but such pluralistic approaches have not yet been fully exploited, nor applied to the context of care in warfare.

It is the aim of these proposed sessions to explore the role, agency, behaviour, and subjective experience of recipients and givers of care in times of warfare throughout the whole medieval period, taking in the early, central and later Middle Ages. Submissions from an interdisciplinary background are particularly welcomed, including, but not limited to, work on narrative texts, literary works, documentary records, artistic sources, religious texts and others. Geographical and linguistic scope is not limited. Proposals will be considered for inclusion in a possible publication.

Topics for discussion could include:
• The identity of caregivers, both formal and informal
• The identity of those requiring care
• Care of the wounded and care of the sick
• Gendered aspects of giving and receiving care
• Transportation of the sick, wounded, incapacitated
• Treatment of the dead
• Caring for enemies, or prisoners of war
• Physical and psychological care
• Spiritual care
• The depiction of care in literary or artistic sources
• The care of injured, incapacitated or disabled combatants
and non-combatants
• The care of animals in a military context
• The relationship between nursing and medical
care/treatment
• The absence of care

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be directed, to J.Phillips@leeds.ac.uk by 04 September 2017.

More info on Academia.edu

CFP – IMC Leeds – Medieval Bodies Ignored

Medieval Bodies Ignored
CfP IMC 2018: Deadline 31St August 2017

Since Caroline Walker Bynum’s 1995 article ‘Why All the Fuss
About the Body?’, the discussion around bodies as historical
bodies has flourished. In these sessions, the intent is to pick out,
from ‘the cacophony of discourses’ that medieval people used to
discuss the body, a few of the notes that are sometimes
overlooked. Discussion post—Caroline Walker Bynum has often
focused on the human body, but her work has also opened up a
wider examination of the ways in which non —human bodies were
conceptualised. Non-human animals, environmental bodies and
socio-political bodies are all discussed in relation to humans and
the non-human body. Equally, humans could also be discussed in
relation to non-human bodies, either in a positive or a derogatory
sense. These sessions will explore how human and non-human
bodies have influenced each other during the Middle Ages and in
scholarship. By examining these seemingly separate discourses in
concert with one another the impact of ideas around
embodiment upon the study of the Middle Ages is revealed and parallels and connections can be exploited.

Themes

‘ Discourses around human and non-human animal bodies:
scientific, literary, juridico—legal.

‘ Concepts of environmental bodies: bodies of water,
geological and geographical bodies, human / non—human
geography.

‘ Political and social bodies: the body politic, the politicised
body, guilds and professional bodies, military bodies.

 

The deadline for 200 – 300 word abstracts is 31st August 2017. Please email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com. And follow them on Twitter: @BodiesIgnored