Archives par mot-clé : Alterity

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Serie : HISTORY AND ARCHEOLOGY

‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period
Who are the ‘other’ women of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period?
This volume seeks to offer a overview on female otherness concentrating on the variety of contexts in which ‘other’ women emerge:
How is their ‘otherness’ constructed?
Who are the forgotten women of the Middle Ages?
How are they perceived?
What makes them ‘other?

 

The literature on women in the Middle Ages or the Early Modern Period has the tendency to mostly emphasize models (be that
saints, queens, or women in positions of power)
and the brighter side of femininity.
This scholarship is occasionally supplemented by individual case studies of ‘other’ women, such as prostitutes, which are usually used to reinforce notions of ‘ideal’ feminine behaviour.
Nevertheless, a volume which encompasses all forms of deviance from the norm seems necessary to counterbalance and to supplement this vast literature on medieval women.
Applying a multi-disciplinary approach to these marginalized women should aid not only in uncovering a more complete picture of medieval women, but also to better understand their own agency and potential for action.

 

This volume welcomes individually – submitted papers, but will also gather the papers from the workshop entitled
“Forgotten Women from a Forgotten Region: Prostitutes and Female Slaves in Central and Eastern Europe in the Long Middle Ages” to be held at Central European University, Budapest, in May, 2017

 

They welcome papers for the volume to be titled Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped. ‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period Aiming to reflect recent research on the construction(s) of female otherness, we call for original manuscripts focusing on (but not limited to) the following transdisciplinary topics related to women :
  • Art: visual and textual sources (the whore of Babylon/the Apocalypse, courtesans, etc)
  • Religion: impure, lapsed, possessed women, heretics
  • Medicine: disabled, mentally insane or ill women , hermaphrodites ; abortions/bodily dysfunctions/malformations
  • Society: witches, beggars, foreigners, enslaved women
  • Sexuality: prostitutes, sexually deviant women

 

Submission Guidelines
Papers should be written following the humanities template and guidelines found at www.trivent-publishing.eu and should have between minimum 7 and maximum 20 pages
We expect submissions by no later than September 2017.

 

The volume will be published open access. It will be listed in
CEEOL, Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources, SSOAR, DOI, and will be sent for evaluation in the Book Citation Index of Thomson Reuters.

 

For information and queries on the scientific content of the volume, please contact the editors of the volume,
Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky,
American University of Central Asia,
znorovszky_a@auca.kg
Christopher Mielke, Central European University,
Mielke_Christopher@phd.ceu.edu
For information on the publication, please contact teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu
or see Trivent Publishing’s website here:
www.trivent -publishing.eu

 

FInd the call for contribution on the editor’s website.

 

 

News ! New serie editor – Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity – MIP University Press–Arc Humanities Press

Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Geographical Scope

Unrestricted

Chronological Scope

Late Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern

Series advisory board

  • Elizabeth B. Bearden (University of Wisconsin)
  • Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University)
  • Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University)
  • Richard H. Godden (Louisiana State University)
  • Maria Fabricius Hansen (University of Copenhagen)
  • Virginia A. Krause (Brown University)
  • Jennifer Spinks (University of Melbourn)
  • Debra Higgs Strickland (University of Glasgow)
  • Wes Williams (University of Oxford)

Series editors

  • Kathleen Perry Long (Cornell University, USA)
  • Luke Morgan (Monash University, Australia)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

[About them : MIP offers rapid turn-around times, the newest digital policies (including full Open Access compliance), and global distribution. In North America books can be purchased through ISD and in Europe and the rest of the world through NBN International.]

 

Le laboratoire ICT (Identités, Cultures, Territoires, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) et le Groupe de Recherche sur l’Eugénisme et le Racisme (UFR EILA, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) sont heureux de vous inviter à une discussion sur Anthropologie et Histoire du Handicap autour de la présentation des derniers ouvrages de Henri-Jacques Stiker (chercheur associé au laboratoire ICT, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot).

Cette rencontre, suivie d’un verre de l’amitié, se tiendra le mercredi 22 mars 2017 de 17h à 19h à l’université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot, bâtiment Sophie Germain, amphithéâtre Turing (8 Place Aurélie Nemours, 75013 Paris, plan en pièce jointe, accessible aux Personnes à mobilité réduite).

Pour toutes demandes complémentaires merci de contacter ninon.dubourg@gmail.com.

En espérant vous accueillir nombreux à cette présentation d’ouvrages,

Nos cordiales salutations.

Podcast – Amputer au Moyen Âge par Patrice Georges

Archéologie de la santé – anthropologie du soin – Colloque international organisé par l’Inrap, en partenariat avec le Musée national de l’homme.
Les  30 novembre et  1er décembre 2016 à l’Auditorium Jean Rouch – Musée de l’Homme

par Patrice Georges, archéo-anthropologue à l’Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (Inrap) et membre de l’UMR 5608 TRACES

L’ensemble des sources disponibles pour le Moyen Âge, dans l’acception la plus large du terme, permet de documenter l’opération chirurgicale de l’amputation (« ablation d’une extrémité du corps, voire d’une partie du corps »), tant sur le plan théorique que pratique. Sources historiques et archives du sol montrent un acte chirurgical réfléchi, maîtrisé, avec des outils appropriés et accompagné des soins concomitants.

Patrice Georges est archéo-anthropologue à l’Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (Inrap) et membre de l’UMR 5608 TRACES « Travaux et recherches archéologiques sur les cultures, les espaces et les sociétés » (équipes Terrae et Pôle Afrique).

À ce titre, il consacre principalement ses recherches sur les pratiques funéraires et les gestes portés sur et autour du corps, en France comme à l’étranger. Il dirige la collection « Mourir à travers les siècles » aux éditions L’Harmattan.

Link for the podcast

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Leprosy and Power

Leeds IMC 2017 – Leprosy and Power

As next year’s IMC theme of ‘Otherness’ lends itself perfectly to the topic of medieval leprosy, I would like to propose a session on the subject of Leprosy and Power, following on from this year’s successful sessions about Leprosy and Identity. In this session, I would like to explore the various ways in which lepers interacted with medieval authorities – how authorities may have attempted to control the behaviour of lepers in their community, how lepers related to those in power, and how they fitted into a social hierarchy.

Possible topics could include:

· Leprosy and the elite

· Municipal authority and common law

· Canon law and the church

· The power of leprosy in society

· Lepers and social status – before / after diagnosis

Proposals should include a title, abstract (approximately 100 words), and institutional affiliation.

Please submit paper proposals by email to Katie Phillips, University of Reading – k.phillips@pgr.reading.ac.uk – by Friday 9th September.

Via Katie Phillips on Academia

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Pilgrimage: restoring physical, mental and spiritual health

Call for Papers: IMC Leeds 2017

Pilgrimage: Restoring Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Sponsored by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading.
The thematic strand for the next International Medieval Congress (3-6 July 2017) at University of Leeds is Otherness. We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute papers to take part in one or more sessions on the theme of pilgrimage as a restorative process between physical, mental, and spiritual sickness and health. We are particularly interested in papers that address identifications of pilgrims as « others » who were undertaking a unique physical and spiritual journey. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:
• Miraculous healing.

• Penitential pilgrimage.

• Proxy pilgrimage.

• Pilgrimage journeys.

• Experiences of pilgrims at shrines.

• Relics and saintly intercession.

• Monastic and lay interactions with the cult of saints.

If you would like to take part in these sessions, please send an abstract of no more than 200 words as well as a short bio to claire.trenery.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk by Friday 16 September 2016.

Organisers Ruth Salter (University of Reading, ) & Claire Treneryand (Royal Holloway, University of London, )

CFP – Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – L’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel – 11  au 14 mai 2017

 

Le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale et l’International Medieval Society-Paris lancent un appel à communication pour une session de communications organisée dans le cadre de l’International Congress on Medieval Studies qui se déroulera à Kalamazoo (USA) du 11  au 14 mai 2017 et qui réunit tous les ans dans le Michigan plus de 3000 médiévistes venus du monde entier. Cet appel conjoint est l’occasion pour le CESCM d’organiser pour la première fois un événement scientifique lors de l’ICMS,  sur le thème de l’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel.

Les propositions de communication (CV et résumé) sont à adresser à Vincent Debiais avant le 15 septembre 2016 ; merci aussi de renseigner la fiche d’inscription de l’ICMS. Pour tout renseignement, contacter Vincent Debiais : vincent.debiais@univ-poitiers.fr

Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

This session will explore new avenues of research on visual signs marking the identity of social, religious, and political groups in different spaces (real or imaginary), and the ways in which these groups distinguished themselves.  Recent advances in the auxiliary sciences, which take into account social phenomena in the origin, creation and usage of systems of signs, permit  to revisit questions posed by emblems, armor, inscriptions, and images that mark the landscape and establish hierarchical spaces, both separate and connected.  In the dialectic of inclusion/exclusion, signs become references of identity included, integrated, claimed or rejected in reaction to historical circumstances and power relations.  This session brings together specialists from different disciplines to explore how visual signs work in real spaces, such as cities, monasteries, and castles; and literary spaces where such signs appear frequently in motifs and narratives.

This session welcomes interdisciplinary submissions.  Scholars working on original approaches to signs of identity through social history, visual culture, and the auxiliary sciences are encouraged to submit abstracts.  In this way, the session will have very broad appeal to participants at Kalamazoo.  Possible themes are: disputes, divisions, and heraldic claims; banners, standards, and flags; epigraphic marking and destruction; the role of written culture/visual culture in the strength of social groups.

 

Voir l’appel sur les carnets du CESCM

CFP – Less than two weeks remaining to get your individual paper proposals for IMC Leeds on « Otherness »

The twenty-third International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017.

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 2,200 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

Drawing medievalists from over 50 countries, with over 1,700 individual papers and 580 academic sessions and a wide range of concerts, performances, readings, round tables, excursions, bookfair and associated events, the Leeds International Medieval Congress is Europe’s largest annual gathering in the humanities.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court). One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups. Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
• Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
• Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
• Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
• Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
• Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)
• Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
• Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
• Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
• Gender and transgender perspectives
• Co-existence and segregation
• Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
• The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Otherness‘ will be co-ordinated by Hans-Werner Goetz (Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg).

 

Please find by cliking this link or below all informations:

Session Proposal

Paper Proposal

Round Table Proposal