Archives par mot-clé : 500-1500

CFP – The Worlds that plague made – NYU Medieval and Renaissance Center – 13-14 april 2018

More info on the organisator website.

CFP – Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, April 12-15.

CFP for Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, NV April 12-15.

Organised by Medieval Association of the Pacific, the Rocky Mountain Medieval and the Renaissance Association

Medieval and early modern societies defined monstrosity in a multitude of ways, assigning the term to figures representing the supernatural “other” and to those representing human alterities. Monsters filled the national consciousness of societies throughout the medieval and early modern worlds. Indeed, the monster became an allegory for a society’s relativisms and fears. So, what happens when the monster is the monarch him or herself—or when the monster is a member of the royal family? How might the term be defined differently or specifically for the sake of this unique person? What special circumstances might be attached to the term and its parameters when the monarch and his or her relationship to the State and its people is concerned? Monarchs of the medieval and early modern periods were deeply concerned about their legacies, and prioritized the public memory of their reigns and dynasties very highly. Similarly, literary and artistic representations of royalty and monarchs often showcase the concerns of dynasty, heredity, and reputation. How is public memory affected when the monarch, or a member of a royal dynasty, is remembered as monstrous for posterity? Moreover, how is royal legacy affected when the term “monster” becomes attached to the monarch while he or she is still living?

MEARCSTAPA invites proposals in all disciplines of the humanities and for all nations, regions, language groups, and cultures of the medieval and early modern periods globally. Please send proposals of 250 words maximum to Asa Mittman asmittman@csuchico.edu, Thea Tomaini tmtomaini@gmail.com, and Ilan Mitchell-Smith Ilan.mitchellsmith@csulb.edu by 14 November 2017.

CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

 

Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages

Organizers: Molly Lewis, George Washington University (mclewis@email.gwu.edu); Arthur Russell, Case Western Reserve University (ajr171@case.edu)

Appeals to smell, taste, see, hear, and touch go a long way to define medieval senses of self and other. In the Middle English Siege of Jerusalem (ca. 1370-1380), for instance, the stench of Jewish corpses “choke” ditches to the horror of Jewish survivors and to the delight of Christian spectators. The sound of the blacksmith’s hammer striking an anvil, as imagined in “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths” (ca. 1275-1300), somehow transmits the color of his blackened skin and the nuisance of his socioeconomic status across great distances. What do we do with works, such as the Siege of Jerusalem and the “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths,” that negatively consume its sensing figures and, by extension, its readers? What is gained in and through these literary assaults on the senses? What are the ends of medieval sensation? How are medieval and modern readers taught to perceive differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability?

Sensory studies often make positive use of the senses, in so far as the senses enable modern audiences to have deeper and more significant encounters with past cultures, histories, and literatures. For all the positive sensations we recognize, medieval senses were just as often engaged in and by art and literature to inculcate difference, justify brutality, and/or cultivate sympathy. “Detecting Difference” invites participants to examine the various formations and capacities of the medieval sensorium to encode and enforce social (dis)orders, paying special attention to techniques for detecting differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability. The panel will build on recent work in the sensory, disability, and race studies—from Mark Smith’s How Race Was Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (2006) to the special issue of postmedieval, edited by Lara Farina and Holly Dugan on “The Intimate Senses” (2012)—to explore how medieval perceptions of difference speak to present-day conversations about difference, about cultures of surveillance, about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas.

Comment: Lara Farina, West Virginia University

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

CFP – The Old and the Young: Medieval Bodies Ignored – ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

The Old and the Young:
Medieval Bodies Ignored

Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 1043 2018

These sessions will concentrate upon the experiences and bodies of the old and the young, Recognising that the medieval normative body (male,
middle aged and white) has influenced the way we look at the MA, the intention of these sessions is to highlight the experiences of children and the elderly which are outside the boundaries of said norm. Furthermore, we wish to gain a greater understanding of how other factors (gender, race, ability, wealth, bodily status, power) intersect with and impact upon the experiences of elderly and young people. While medieval childhood studies is by no means a neglected field, historiography has recently turned away from a ‘panhistorical and essentialist’ child-centric model. This allows us to examine the experiences of a child within culturally specific contexts in which it might be neglected, abandoned or dismissed. Meanwhile, the old are often marginalised in scholarship, within the medieval discourse and in our lived reality. The hope is that by examining their experiences in concert with one another, we will be able to build up a clearer understanding of the lived experience of the old and the young in the Middle Ages.

Intersectional, interdisciplinary abstracts would be particularly welcomed.
Possible Topics Include:
‘ Specific historical experiences of being young and old
‘ Body as physical entity and as a site of rhetoric
‘ Dual nature of body: site of discourse and identity
‘ Descriptions of old and young bodies

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15- to 20-minute paper as well as a Participant Information Form to medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com by September 15, 2017.

 

CFP – Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War – IMC Leeds 2018

Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War

International Medieval Congress – Leeds
July 2018

During conflicts, bodies and minds are subjected to injury. Although a truism, this aspect of the experience of medieval warfare is somewhat underexplored. Recent studies of wounds and wounding and the incidence and experience of sickness during military campaigns have begun to focus attention on how medieval combatants and non-combatants suffered bodily and mental damage in times of war. At the same time, new work has put this experience in a medical context, examining contemporary sources to see how the experience of infirmity in times of war was recorded and interpreted by observers in the medieval medical framework of humoralism. However, there is scope for further investigation across the whole medieval period, and in particular on the experience of the incapacitated as recipients of bodily, psychological, medical and spiritual care.

 

The experience of the injured, sick, and incapacitated is one half of any medical history; the identity and practice of those who offer care to them is the other half. The role of carer is a complex one. Carers might have significant knowledge of nursing or medicine, or be thrust into the role of carer by circumstance. They may experience physical and emotional labour in offering care to the incapacitated, and need care themselves. Recent work on the history of medical practitioners shows us that we should look beyond those identified as ‘medics’ in contemporary to fully understand the landscape of medical care in the Middle Ages, but such pluralistic approaches have not yet been fully exploited, nor applied to the context of care in warfare.

It is the aim of these proposed sessions to explore the role, agency, behaviour, and subjective experience of recipients and givers of care in times of warfare throughout the whole medieval period, taking in the early, central and later Middle Ages. Submissions from an interdisciplinary background are particularly welcomed, including, but not limited to, work on narrative texts, literary works, documentary records, artistic sources, religious texts and others. Geographical and linguistic scope is not limited. Proposals will be considered for inclusion in a possible publication.

Topics for discussion could include:
• The identity of caregivers, both formal and informal
• The identity of those requiring care
• Care of the wounded and care of the sick
• Gendered aspects of giving and receiving care
• Transportation of the sick, wounded, incapacitated
• Treatment of the dead
• Caring for enemies, or prisoners of war
• Physical and psychological care
• Spiritual care
• The depiction of care in literary or artistic sources
• The care of injured, incapacitated or disabled combatants
and non-combatants
• The care of animals in a military context
• The relationship between nursing and medical
care/treatment
• The absence of care

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be directed, to J.Phillips@leeds.ac.uk by 04 September 2017.

More info on Academia.edu

CFP – Medieval Bodies Ignored: Politics, Culture & Flesh – organised by BodiesIgnored at University of Leeds, Institute For Medieval Studies – 4-6 may 2018

Medieval Bodies Ignored: Politics, Culture & Flesh

University of Leeds, Institute For Medieval Studies

Friday 4th to Sunday 6th May 2018

This interdisciplinary conference will concentrate upon the cultural history of the body, particularly that relating to bodies that are ignored, by either medieval society or modern scholarship. This conference is interested in building up a sensory and somatic understanding of daily corporeal existence in the Middle Ages, with a particular focus on those elements of medieval society that are both seen and unseen.  The weary carthorse, the one-legged beggar and the cradle-bound child were all bodies that were ubiquitous and thus/yet invisible; by attempting to access those elements of this landscape that were tacitly understood at the time, but difficult for the modern scholar to access, this conference hopes to encourage a richer understanding of the complexity of medieval life and culture.

Abstract submissions from a variety of disciplines are encouraged and we hope to be able to curate an exchange of ideas, strategies and theories with which we can develop a methodological support structure for interdisciplinary cultural studies.

 

Themes :

— Marginalised bodies (Socially, physically, legally)

— The body politic

— Seeing the unseen

— Knowledge of the body and bodily customs

— Artisans of the body, expanding notions of health and medicine

— The ignored body in space and place (e.g. war, urban/ rural, court/ Cloister)

— Ignored bodies: Dead, dis / abled, sacred, non—human animal, child, supernatural, female, racially othered, or otherwise overlooked due to status

— Methodological tactics for studying the overlooked body

Please submit abstracts for 20 min paper (max 300 words) by 28th February 2018 midday GMT to Email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com
Twitter: @bodiesignored

 

More infos on the organiser’s website

 

Roundtable – #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

#disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a bring your own lunch affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success, and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network. We are now moving into more official outlets for discussion, and are putting together a Roundtable for IMC 2018.

We invite abstracts for 5 minute talks as part of a roundtable discussion about accessibility in Higher Education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness and mental health to name but a few. Papers might address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, or pinpoint an issue that needs addressing.

Please send an abstract of no more than 150 words outlining your talk to alexralee12@gmail.com by August 20th [deadline extended : 15 september !]

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

This panel invites trans-historical and trans-disciplinary examinations of pre-modern disability studies, focusing particularly on the construction of the devotional subject across the lines of periodicity. Medievalists and early modernists working in the burgeoning field of disability studies have shown that “disability” was an operative category in premodern texts, with subjects constituted by different or “non-standard” bodies, minds, and spirits. This roundtable proposes to extend this conversation by turning to religious experience and devotion, an important discursive field for the construction of identity by marginalized and/or minority groups.

Devotional manuals, spiritual biographies, and hagiographies – both before and after the Reformation – involve disclosures and depictions of impairment, asking their audiences to identify with a construction of ability related to devotional practice. Questions participants might ask include:
· What constitutes a “non-standard” body in pastoral, contemplative, and narrative devotional writing?
· How do figurative and allegorical depictions of disabled bodies in religious literature construct the disabled subject?
· What accommodations should be accepted for a disabled body to attain a recommended devotional posture?
· How does devotional didacticism approach variation in sensory acuity?
· How are devotional communities and cultures defined by conceptions of ability and impairment?
· Under which circumstances is the attainment of a-typical ability the aim of devotional practice?
· How might legal and ethical debates about injury, loss, and retribution be shaped by conceptions of impairment?

This roundtable invites a conversation on how devotional practices, and the very nature of devotion, evolved with (or stubbornly resisted) the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, reshaping the construction of the disabled subject. We invite a range of approaches, including contemporary theoretical lenses on disability studies as well as historical and literary-formal examinations of the subject.

Please send 300-word abstracts for ten-minute roundtable papers to José Villagrana (jvillagr@bates.edu) and Spencer Strub (spencer.strub@berkeley.edu) by September 15, 2017.