Archives par mot-clé : 500-1500

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

Journée d’étude – « Soigner au Moyen Âge », le 9 janvier 2018 à l’espace Mendès France de Poitiers

Soigner au Moyen Âge

9 Janvier 2018 à  10 h 00

POITIERS (86) | Espace Mendès France

Journée d’études sous la direction scientifique de Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648.

9h30 – Accueil

10h-10h30 – Mot de bienvenue par Didier Moreau, directeur de l’Espace Mendès France et introduction par Martin Aurell, directeur du Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM), université de Poitiers et Laurence Moulinier-Brogi

10h30-11h15Les formes de la relation patient-médecin au Moyen Âge par Marilyn Nicoud, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université d’Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, CIHAM-UMR 5648

11h15-11h30 – Questions

11h30-12h15Soigner du poison à la fin du Moyen Âge. Des écrits spécialisés ? par Franck Collard, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université Paris-Nanterre, CHISCO-EA 1587

12h15-12h30 – Questions

12h30 – Déjeuner

14h-14h45Le rôle du vin dans la médecine médiévale par Azélina Jaboulet-Vercherre, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section, Visiting Professor, IEP, Paris

14h45-15h – Questions

15h-15h45Soigner et transmettre au XIIe siècle : « magister Egidius » par Mireille Ausécache, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section

15h45-16h – Questions

16h-16h15 – Pause

16h15-17hErreurs médicales, échecs et tromperies par Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648

17h15-17h30 – Conclusion

En partenariat avec le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM) de l’université de Poitiers dans le cadre de l’Atelier interdisciplinaire.

Information à retrouver sur le site web de l’espace Mendès France.

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

CFP – Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – Queen’s university Belfast – 13-15th April 2018

Queen’s university Belfast presents : Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – 13-15th April 2018

We are pleased to invite abstract of ca. 250 words related to pain in the middle ages. Topics may include but are not limited to :

  • collective pain
  • depictions of pain,
  • explanations of pain,
  • judicial literature,
  • medical literature,
  • memory and pain,
  • narratives of suffering,
  • pain and creativity,
  • pain and pleasure,
  • psychological pain,
  • social pain,
  • religious literature,
  • suffering in the afterlife

Please send abstracts of ca. 250 words, along with a short academic biography, to borderlinesxxii@gmail.com

The deadline for abstracts is 5th February 2018.

 

More info on the Bordrelines XXII website.

CFP – Illuminating Hidden Figures, Diversity and Difference in the Middle Ages – New England Medieval Studies Consortium Brown University March 17-18, 2018

Illuminating Hidden Figures

Diversity and Difference in the Middle Ages

New England Medieval Studies Consortium Brown University March 17-18, 2018

The diversity of medieval Europe has come under close scrutiny from all sides. As medievalists have, with increasing vigor, insisted on complex and nuanced understandings of the constitution of both normative European societies and their interactions with those surrounding them, popular ideological movements have sought to claim the medieval past as a homogeneous, `white’ male space. Whether it is studied through art, literature, theology, history, gender and sexuality studies, or any of the other manifold disciplines that comprise medieval studies, the question of diversity and difference in the middle ages thus represents not only an increasingly fruitful avenue of scholarly inquiry, but also a vital interface between academia and the public at large. This conference therefore invites papers which explore this question and its modern implications through intellectual history, scriptural exegesis, art and material culture, pedagogical approaches, philology, literary studies, digital humanities, or any other ways in which diversity and difference in the middle ages can be understood. We also invite papers that address the exchange of culture and material from outside Europe.

We welcome both individual papers and full panel proposals. We also welcome volunteers for chairing panels. Papers should be 20 minutes in length, and may be from any discipline or geographic specialization. Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to nemsc.2018@gmail.com by January 1, 2018.

Graduate students whose abstracts are selected for the conference will have the opportunity to submit full papers for consideration for the Alison Goddard Elliott Award.

CFP – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Appel à contribution – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international, Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018
Deadline : 31 décembre 2017

Dans la pensée médiévale, le corps humain fonctionne comme un miroir de l’univers et un modèle pour comprendre la nature, pour interpréter la Bible, pour renforcer les structures sociales et politiques. La déformation et la métamorphose du corps mettent en question cette fonction, surtout quand le corps franchit les frontières entre les différentes espèces et se contamine avec le non-humain, qu’il soit animal, végétal ou objet inanimé.

A l’époque médiévale, la littérature, l’art et la science enjambaient la distance qui sépare l’humain et le non-humain au moyen de créatures hybrides, dont l’identité était marquée par l’ambivalence. Les monstres anthropomorphes, les peuples exotiques censés avoir des traits animaux ou végétaux, les figures humaines intégrant des armes ou d’autres objets dans leurs corps, les animaux ou les plantes portant des ressemblances inquiétantes avec les humains : autant de créations qui dessinaient une constellation de possibilités dans un continuum des êtres.

Si la recherche sur la tératologie s’est parfois occupée de ces combinaisons d’humain et non-humain, les investigations se sont surtout concentrées sur les monstres en tant que représentation de l’altérité. Le temps est venu pour changer de perspective et pour considérer ces corps hybrides comme les produits d’une réflexion sur la possibilité (ou l’impossibilité) de penser l’être humain comme un être fluide et ouvert au non-humain.

Les communications, de la durée d’environ 20 minutes, porteront sur des cas d’interférence du corps humain avec l’animal, le végétal et l’inanimé, et viseront à répondre à des questions telles que : Quelle est la fonction du corps hybride dans la relation à l’humain ? Qu’est-ce qu’il enseigne au lecteur ? Comment l’hybride s’inscrit-t-il dans la représentation de l’identité sociale, politique ou ethnique ?

Modalité de soumission

Nous invitons chaleureusement celles et ceux qui seraient intéressés à nous envoyer une proposition. Cet appel est ouvert aux chercheurs et chercheuses à tous les niveaux de leur carrière, dans les domaines de la littérature, de l’art, de l’histoire culturelle et de l’histoire des sciences du Moyen Âge. Les propositions consisteront en un titre et un résumé de communication d’environ 250 mots, et devront être envoyées à l’adresse antonella.sciancalepore@uclouvain.be avant le 31 décembre 2017.

Comité organisateur

Baudouin Van den Abeele (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Antonella Sciancalepore (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Mattia Cavagna (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Craig Baker (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Conference – Susan Edgington (Queen Mary, London): Guido of vigevano’s rules of health for an old man going on crusade – 1 march 2018

Conference – Susan Edgington (Queen Mary, London)

Guido of vigevano’s rules of health for an old man going on crusade

1 march 2018, Graduate centre for Medieval Studies,  University of Reading

 

More infos on the university website

CFP – The Worlds that plague made – NYU Medieval and Renaissance Center – 13-14 april 2018

More info on the organisator website.

CFP – Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, April 12-15.

CFP for Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, NV April 12-15.

Organised by Medieval Association of the Pacific, the Rocky Mountain Medieval and the Renaissance Association

Medieval and early modern societies defined monstrosity in a multitude of ways, assigning the term to figures representing the supernatural “other” and to those representing human alterities. Monsters filled the national consciousness of societies throughout the medieval and early modern worlds. Indeed, the monster became an allegory for a society’s relativisms and fears. So, what happens when the monster is the monarch him or herself—or when the monster is a member of the royal family? How might the term be defined differently or specifically for the sake of this unique person? What special circumstances might be attached to the term and its parameters when the monarch and his or her relationship to the State and its people is concerned? Monarchs of the medieval and early modern periods were deeply concerned about their legacies, and prioritized the public memory of their reigns and dynasties very highly. Similarly, literary and artistic representations of royalty and monarchs often showcase the concerns of dynasty, heredity, and reputation. How is public memory affected when the monarch, or a member of a royal dynasty, is remembered as monstrous for posterity? Moreover, how is royal legacy affected when the term “monster” becomes attached to the monarch while he or she is still living?

MEARCSTAPA invites proposals in all disciplines of the humanities and for all nations, regions, language groups, and cultures of the medieval and early modern periods globally. Please send proposals of 250 words maximum to Asa Mittman asmittman@csuchico.edu, Thea Tomaini tmtomaini@gmail.com, and Ilan Mitchell-Smith Ilan.mitchellsmith@csulb.edu by 14 November 2017.

CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

 

Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages

Organizers: Molly Lewis, George Washington University (mclewis@email.gwu.edu); Arthur Russell, Case Western Reserve University (ajr171@case.edu)

Appeals to smell, taste, see, hear, and touch go a long way to define medieval senses of self and other. In the Middle English Siege of Jerusalem (ca. 1370-1380), for instance, the stench of Jewish corpses “choke” ditches to the horror of Jewish survivors and to the delight of Christian spectators. The sound of the blacksmith’s hammer striking an anvil, as imagined in “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths” (ca. 1275-1300), somehow transmits the color of his blackened skin and the nuisance of his socioeconomic status across great distances. What do we do with works, such as the Siege of Jerusalem and the “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths,” that negatively consume its sensing figures and, by extension, its readers? What is gained in and through these literary assaults on the senses? What are the ends of medieval sensation? How are medieval and modern readers taught to perceive differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability?

Sensory studies often make positive use of the senses, in so far as the senses enable modern audiences to have deeper and more significant encounters with past cultures, histories, and literatures. For all the positive sensations we recognize, medieval senses were just as often engaged in and by art and literature to inculcate difference, justify brutality, and/or cultivate sympathy. “Detecting Difference” invites participants to examine the various formations and capacities of the medieval sensorium to encode and enforce social (dis)orders, paying special attention to techniques for detecting differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability. The panel will build on recent work in the sensory, disability, and race studies—from Mark Smith’s How Race Was Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (2006) to the special issue of postmedieval, edited by Lara Farina and Holly Dugan on “The Intimate Senses” (2012)—to explore how medieval perceptions of difference speak to present-day conversations about difference, about cultures of surveillance, about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas.

Comment: Lara Farina, West Virginia University

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !