CFP – International Medieval Society – Evil

EVIL

ims-paris

Paris, 29 June- 1 July 2017

For its 14th Annual Symposium, the International Medieval Society invites abstracts on the theme of Evil in the Middle Ages. The concept of evil, and the tensions it reveals about the relationship between internal and external identities, fits well into recent trends in scholarship that have focused attention on medieval bodies, boundaries, and otherness. Medieval bodies frequently blur the distinctions between moral and non-moral evil. External, monstrous appearances are often seen as testament to internal dispositions, and illnesses might be seen as a reflection of a person’s evil nature. More generally, evil may stand in for an entire, contrasting ideological viewpoint, as much as for a particular kind of behaviour, action, or being. It may appear in the world through intentional acts, as well as through accidental occurrences, through demonic intervention as much as through human weakness and sin. It may be rooted in anger, spread through violence, or thrive on ignorance, emerging from either the natural world or from mankind.

Alongside those working on bodies and monstrosity, the question of evil has also preoccupied scholars working to understand the limits of moral responsibility and the links between destiny and decision as shown in medieval literary, artistic and historical productions. The 14th Annual IMS Symposium on Evil aims to focus on the many facets of medieval evil, analysing the intersections between evil as concept and form, as well as taking into account medieval responses to evil and its potential effects.

This Symposium will thus explore (but is not limited to) three broad themes:

1)    Concepts of evil: discourse on morality and moral understandings of evil; reflections on the relationship between good and evil; heresy and heretical beliefs, teachings, writings; evil and sin; evil and conscience; associations with hell, the devil; types of evil behaviour or evil thoughts; categories of evil; evil as disorder/chaos; evil as corruption; evil and mankind

2)    Embodied evil/being evil/evil beings: monstrosity; the demonic; perceptions of deformity and disfigurement; evil transformations and metamorphoses; magic and the supernatural; outward expressions of evil (e.g. through clothing, material possessions); evil objects

3)    Responses to evil: punishments; the purging and/or exorcism of evil; inquisition; evil speech; warnings about evil (textual, visual, musical); ways to avoid evil or to protect oneself (talismans etc.); the temptation of evil; emotional responses to evil; social exclusion as a response to evil.

Through these broad themes, we aim to encourage the participation of researchers with varying backgrounds and fields of expertise: historians, art historians, musicologists, philologists, literary specialists, and specialists in the auxiliary sciences (palaeographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists). While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcome and encouraged. By bringing together a wide variety of papers that both survey and explore this field, the IMS Symposium intends to bring a fresh perspective to the notion of evil in medieval culture.

Proposals of no more than 300 words (in English or French) for a 20-minute paper should be e-mailed to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com by November 5th 2016. Each should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment that you require.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis. The selection committee will email applicants in late November to notify them of its decision. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website. Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fee (35 euros, reduced for students, free for IMS-Paris members).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organisation that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For the past ten years, the IMS has served as a centre for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work, or study.

For more information about the IMS-Paris and past symposia programmes, please visit our website: www.ims-paris.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:
The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:
1) a symposium paper abstract
2) an outline of a current research project (PhD. dissertation research)
3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350 euros to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150 euros) will be paid at the Symposium.

 

Call for Papers – Medieval Association of the Pacific Conference 2017 – « Collecting the Monstrous »

Call for Papers
Medieval Association of the Pacific Conference 2017
MEARCSTAPA Proposed Session
NEW DEADLINE

Collecting the Monstrous

Medieval and early modern history, art, and literature often depict collections of strange, uncanny, or monstrous things. Bestiaries sometimes depict exotic animals or monstrous, composite creatures; those in the relic trade (such as Chaucer’s Pardoner) boasted collections of relics and other “miraculous” items, some of which were gruesome. Monastic houses and churches guarded proudly their (supposedly authentic) relics and other collections of ephemera, and developed sensational and shocking stories about these objects. Witch hunters and Inquisitors of the early modern period sometimes kept macabre souvenirs of those they interrogated, such as purported pacts with the devil, witch bottles, and other types of physical “evidence” of hexes or spells. Such collections both contributed to and inhibited the development of early modern antiquarianism in the period 1500-1700.

What is the belief system or thought process behind the accumulation of objects that are “othered” by an association with the uncanny or monstrous? What spiritual or psychological effects were they meant to have on their collectors and their beholders? The issue of authenticity is problematic, as strange beasts in bestiaries, relics for sale, confiscated satanic accoutrements and objects at the center of a church’s strange story were usually not genuine. What relationship did medieval and early modern collectors of objects have with the concept of authenticity when it came to the collection of objects considered to be uncanny or macabre? How do their attitudes about authenticity affect those of the 21st century scholar of medieval and early modern studies? What are the challenges of communicating the accumulation of uncanny or monstrous collections of objects to students? Moreover, what are modern scholars to do with such objects when they turn up in museums, churches, or universities? The precursors to our modern museums were early modern cabinets of curiosity, filled with strange and wondrous curios from throughout the world. How do these origins linger in present institutions? MEARCSTAPA seeks papers that examine the collecting of items that are considered uncanny, preternatural, or monstrous in medieval or early modern history, art, or literature in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, or Asia.

Please send proposals of 300 words by October 29, 2017 to Thea Tomaini at tmtomaini@gmail.com and Asa Simon Mittman at asmittman@mail.csuchico.edu.

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici

Conference – Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History – Monica H. Green – AHA conference

Session : Historians and Geneticists in Collaborative Research

AHA Session 254
Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:30 PM-5:00 PM
Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center, Ballroom Level) Denver.
Chair:
John R. McNeill, Georgetown University

Session Abstract:

An editorial in Nature (25 May 2016) notes that historians have been critical of recent interpretations of European migrations by geneticists, but from their armchairs. Princeton Medieval historian Patrick Geary is quoted as urging historians to be more proactive and take part in genetic research: “If historians do not get involved and engage with this technology seriously, we’re going to see more and more studies that are done by geneticists with very little input from historians, or from frankly second-rate historians.” This session includes presentations by two historians and one geneticist, to show how collaborative study linking historians and geneticists can advance the quality of historical studies relying on genetic information. The session is intended to encourage discussion among historians, especially early-career historians, on how involvement in research and study of the genetic-historical literature can lead to rewarding careers that substantially advance knowledge of the human past from this new angle.

Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History

Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:50 PM, Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center)

Monica H. Green, Arizona State University

Every pre-modern historian knows how rarely we have all the evidence we want. We know that something happened in history’s silences because we know that human societies persisted. So, too, the palaeogeneticist must assume the continuity of life between the few random molecular fossils uncovered from the past, for that is the basic premise of evolutionary theory. But in all fields that deal with gap-ridden evidence, the question remains: what are legitimate methods for construing what happened in those gaps?Although climate scientists and historians now work toward consilience of written and physical data, that happy détente has yet to be achieved in biological history. Yes, the call to resist “cherry picking those milestones in human history that are best recorded” should be heeded. But what happens when this new kind of bioarchaeology treads into territory historians consider theirs, where there are written records? Who cedes to whom?

This paper will focus not on human genetics but on the molecular histories of the pathogens that kill and maim us. I will use the example of the Second Plague Pandemic (14th-19th centuries) to assert that consilience with History, with a capital ‘H’, is urgently needed for one simple reason: because the most disruptive biological actors in epidemic circumstances are humans themselves.

More information on the AHA program !

CFP – Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness – IMC

Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness,

IMC Leeds 2017

Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness and impairment as well as in the healing practices. They are not anymore seen as competing but rather as supporting, even complementing each other.  Both religion and medicine had their own ways of defining the undesirable, which could lead to the construction of ‘The Other’ – be it disability, mental disorder, or heterodoxy. Some features, like lunacy, leprosy, impotence, or infertility were in the nexus of both religious and medicinal explanations. Both religion and medicine could also offer methods for cure and ways to integrate the deviant persons back into a community. The interconnection of both concepts can be found, for example, in hagiography, sermons, medical treatises and herbals. These sessions aim to analyse healing as cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medicinal explanation intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’ and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorizing and treating different spiritual, mental and bodily conditions.

We aim at organizing a double session focusing on following questions:

  • Role of medicine and/or religion in constructing the Other
  • Role of medicine and/or religion in experiences of the patient
  • Religion and medicine – rivalling, complementing or symbiotic?
  • Treating the patient, curing the ailment – integration or permanent marginalization?
  • Faith healing and placebo – synonyms, interconnection, anachronisms?

We encourage proposals sensitive to temporal and/or geographical changes focusing on various cultural levels and social contexts. Those interested in presenting a paper in this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words to the organisers by 23 September 2016.

Contacts:
Jenni Kuuliala jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa sari.katajala-peltomaa@uta.fi
Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern Studies

New publication – Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages, by Jenni Kuuliala

 See original image

 

Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages.

Constructions of Impairments in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Canonization Processes

by Jenni Kuuliala

 

In this volume, testimonies from medieval canonization processes are (for the first time) systematically used as sources for the study of medieval attitudes and everyday life concerning physical impairments, particularly of children.

This volume offers new insights into medieval disability studies by analysing miracle testimonies from canonization processes as sources for the study of medieval attitudes to and understanding of childhood physical impairments: how they were defined, and the social consequences of childhood disability on the family, on the community, and on children themselves.

In these texts, laypeople from different social groups carefully described events leading to children’s miraculous cures of physical impairments, as well as the conditions themselves. They thus provide an exceptionally rich (yet hitherto unexplored) window into the ways in which medieval society defined, explained, and understood children’s impairments.

Besides simply describing disabilities and miraculous cures, these testimonies also reveal various aspects of everyday experiences and communal attitudes towards impaired children. The few testimonies by the children themselves offer fascinating insights into personal experiences of physical disability and how disability affected a child’s socialization and the formation of identity.

This study thus aims to tease apart the often-complex ways in which medieval society both viewed physical differences and how it chose to (re)construct these differences in the discourse of the miraculous, as well as in everyday life.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Family and the Conceptions of Impairment

Chapter 2: Community and the Impaired Child

Chapter 3: Reconstructing Lived Experience

Chapter 4: Conclusions: Impairment and Social Inclusion

Bibliography

 

Find more information on the editor’s bewsite

New publication – The Routledge History of Disease ed. by Mark Jackson

Mark Jackson, The Routledge history of disease, 2016.

 

The Routledge History of Disease draws on innovative scholarship in the history of medicine to explore the challenges involved in writing about health and disease throughout the past and across the globe, presenting a varied range of case studies and perspectives on the patterns, technologies and narratives of disease that can be identified in the past and that continue to influence our present.

Organized thematically, chapters examine particular forms and conceptualizations of disease, covering subjects from leprosy in medieval Europe and cancer screening practices in twentieth-century USA to the ayurvedic tradition in ancient India and the pioneering studies of mental illness that took place in nineteenth-century Paris, as well as discussing the various sources and methods that can be used to understand the social and cultural contexts of disease. The book is divided into four sections, focusing in turn on historical models of disease, shifting temporal and geographical patterns of disease, the impact of new technologies on categorizing, diagnosing and treating disease, and the different ways in which patients and practitioners, as well as novelists and playwrights, have made sense of their experiences of disease in the past.

International in scope, chronologically wide-ranging and illustrated with images and maps, this comprehensive volume is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of health through the ages.

 

Table of Contents

List of figures

List of tables

Acknowledgements

List of contributors

1. Perspectives on the History of Disease – Mark Jackson

Part One: Models

2. Humours and Humoral Theory – Jim Hankinson

3. Models of Disease in Ayurvedic Medicine – Dominik Wujastyk

4. Religion, Magic and Medicine – Catherine Rider

5. Contagion – Michael Worboys

6. Emotions and Mental Illness – Elena Carrera

7. Deviance as Disease: The Medicalization of Sex and Crime – Jana Funke

Part Two: Patterns

8. Pandemics – Mark Harrison

9. Patterns of Animal Disease – Abigail Woods

10. Patterns of Plague in Late Medieval and Early-Modern Europe – Samuel Cohn

11. Symptoms of Empire: Cholera in Southeast Asia, 1820-1850 – Robert Peckham

12. Disease, Geography, and the Market: Epidemics of Cholera in Tokyo in the Late Nineteenth Century – Akihito Suzuki

13. Histories and Narratives of Yellow Fever in Latin America – Monica Garcia

14. Race, Disease and Public Health: Perceptions of Māori Health – Katrina Ford

15. Re-writing the ‘English disease’: Migration, Ethnicity and ‘Tropical Rickets’ – Roberta Bivins

16. Social Geographies of Sickness and Health in Contemporary Paris: Toward a Human Ecology of Mortality in the 2003 Heat Wave Disaster – Richard Keller

Part Three: Technologies

17. Disability and Prosthetics in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-century England – David Turner

18. Disease, Rehabilitation and Pain – Julie Anderson

19. From Paraffin to PIP: The Surgical Search for the Perfect Breast – Fay Bound Alberti

20. Cancer Screening – David Cantor

21. Medical Bacteriology: Microbes and Disease, 1870 – 2000 – Christoph Gradmann

22. Technology and the `Social Disease’ – Helen Bynum

23. Reorganising Chronic Disease Management: Diabetes and Bureaucratic Technologies in Post-War British General Practice – Martin Moore

24. Before HIV: Venereal Disease Among Homosexually Active Men in the Anglo-American World – Richard McKay

Part Four: Narratives

25. Leprosy and Identity in the Middle Ages – Elma Brenner

26. French Medical Consultations by Mail, 1600-1800 – Robert Weston

27. The Clinical Narratives of James Parkinson’s Essay on the Shaking Palsy (1817) – Brian Hurwitz

28. Digital Narratives: 4 ‘Hits’ in the History of Migraine – Katherine Foxhall

29. Case Notes and Madness – Alannah Tomkins

30. Literature and Disease: A Novel Contagion – Sam Goodman

31. When Bodies Need Stories in Pictures – Arthur Frank

32. Living in the Present: Illness, Phenomenology, and Well-being – Havi Carel

Index

Find all the information on the editor website (Routledge)

CFP – Histories of Healthy Ageing – University of Groningen, 21–23 June 2017

Histories of Healthy Ageing

University of Groningen, 21–23 June 2017

As Western populations grow increasingly older, ‘healthy ageing’ is presented as one of today’s greatest medical and societal challenges. However, contrary to what many policy makers want us to believe, the aspiration to live long, healthy and happy lives is not a problem specific to our times. On the contrary successful ageing has a long history.

The conference Histories of Healthy Ageing is based on the assumption that ‘healthy ageing’ has informed the medical agenda since Antiquity. With ‘healthy ageing’ we refer to ways of thinking about and treating the body not only from a medical perspective, but also taking into account questions of what constitutes a happy and fulfilled life. In particular these latter issues were central to medicine before 1800 and relate to healthy living as much as to questions connected specifically to old age. Thus whether we speak of classic ways of training the athlete’s body, medieval religious rites, the pre-modern obsession with regimen (rules for living a healthy life), or the upper-class fancy to visit spas, at the root of it all was a wish for wellbeing, health and longevity.

The conference focuses especially (but not exclusively) on the pre-modern period. Submissions for 20-minute papers should include a 250-word abstract and a short CV. Subject to funding small travel grants might be available for junior researchers.
Possible topics include:

  • Histories of diet and dietetics, ‘sports’, spas and bathing, medication and life-elixirs, etc.
  • The materiality of healthy living and ageing (pills, powders and elixirs, bath houses, exercise apparatus, scales and the like)
  • Aesthetics and the history of cosmetic surgery
  • Prognosis and historical efforts to chart life expectancy
  • Relations between patients and doctors
  • Ars Moriendi and resilience in the face of illness and death
  • Healthy living and ageing outside academic medicine (quacks, alchemy, homeopathy)
  • Narratives of ‘healthy ageing’
  • The philosophical question of what constitutes a long and happy life
  • Life cycles
  • The understanding and application of the six ‘non-naturals’
  • Healthy ageing and the arts

Keynote lectures:

At the conference 5 keynote lectures will centre on the non-naturals, the areas defined by Hippocratic writers as the basis of health management and disease prevention.

  • Food and Drink by Elizabeth Williams (Oklahoma State)
  • Exercise and Rest by Onno van Nijf (Groningen)
  • Sleep and Wakefulness by William Maclehose (UC London)
  • Excretion and Retention by Michael Stolberg (Würzburg)
  • Perturbations of the Mind and Emotions by Irena Metzler (Swansea)

In addition to these specialised lectures there will be a public lecture by Robert Zwijnenberg (Leiden University) on Pre-modern Healthy Ageing and Modern Bio-medical Art.
Exhibition

The conference will be accompanied by an exhibition in the Groningen University Museum and the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG).
It opens June 2017.
Conference Organisers: Rina Knoeff, Ruben Verwaal, Catrien Santing, James Kennaway, Rolf ter Sluis.

Submissions and queries should be sent to: historiesofhealthyageing@gmail.com

Call closes: 1 December 2016

Download the Call for Papers here.

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe