Podcast – Dr. Luke Demaitre on Pandemic Diseases in the Middle Ages – AUP and Medieval Institute Publications

Dr. Luke Demaitre on Pandemic Diseases in the Middle Ages

Luke Demaitre speaks with Erin Lynch at the 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies about teaching medieval history to STEM students, medieval medicine, and the similarities between the public responses to AIDS and leprosy.

Luke E. Demaitre is a visiting professor of history in the Humanities in Medicine Program at the University of Virginia in the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities.
Erin Lynch is a graduate student at the Medieval Institute at Western Michigan University. Her BA is from the University of Texas at Arlington.

AUP and Medieval Institute Publications

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

Programme – Disability and Religion, 10th Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World, Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

f

Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World

10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 2nd December

10:00 Welcome (Irina Metzler, Swansea University)

10:15-11:15 Opening Keynote Address

Responsibility, Sin, and Impairment in the Middle Ages

Wendy J. Turner (Augusta University)

11:15-12:45 Panel: Disabled Religious: Saints, Monks and Anchoresses

Moderator: Alicia Spencer-Hall

Disability or Super-ability? Saints’ Infirmities as a Tool for Constructing Sanctity

(Jenni Kuuliala, University of Tampere)

Deaf, Monks and Sign Language

(Yann Cantin, Université-Paris 8)

Ancrene Riwle: Disabling the Able, How Un-Medieval!

(Stan Booth, University of Winchester)

12:45-13:45 Lunch

13:45-14:40 Panel: Non-conformist Bodies

Moderator: Stan Booth

The Hun and the Hunchback

Mark Humphries (Swansea University)

‘Sumo michi baculum’: Problematizing the Purpose of ‘Walking Sticks’ in the Late Middle Ages

(Rachael Gillibrand, University of Leeds)

14:40-15:35 Panel: Miracles and Metaphors

Moderator: Ninon Dubourg

The Cure-Seeking Experiences of Disabled Children in Twelfth-Century English Miracula

(Ruth Salter, University of Reading)

A Double Absence: Cupid and Blind Lucy Reading John Donne’s ‘Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day, Being The Shortest Day’

(Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester)

15:35-16:00 Coffee Break

16:00-16:50 Panel: Relevance of Digital Tools for Medieval Manuscript Studies

(Erin Connelly, University of Pennsylvania)

This panel will take the form of a presentation followed by a workshop inviting audience participation and discussion

SATURDAY 3rd December

9:15-10:45 Panel: Disability and Mental ‘Abnormality’

Moderator: Wendy Turner

Graeco-Latin Medical Learning in an Early Irish Pseudo-Etymology of Boicmell ‘Fool’

(Anna Matheson, Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique, Rennes)

The Holy Fool and the Madman: When was Mental Abnormality a Disability?

(Claire Trenery, Royal Holloway, University of London)

Skiptingr, Congeon and Wehselkind: Exploring the Medieval Discourse on Changelings and Idiocy through Vernacular Insults

(Rose Sawyer, University of Leeds)

10:45-11:05 Coffee Break

11:05-12:00 Panel: Disability and Leprosy

Moderator: Trish Skinner

Disability and Ability within the Leper Houses of Medieval Normandy

(Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library)

Redeemed by a Good Death!

(Timothy Jones, University of Cardiff)

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-13:55 Panel: Disability in the Earlier Middle Ages

Moderator: Christina Lee

Finding Disability in Early Medieval Sources: The Case of Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester

(Alison Hudson, The British Library)

A Disabled Corpse – An Exploration of the Potential Significance of an Anglo Saxon Burial Cluster from Great Chesterford, Essex

(Stephanie Evelyn-Wright, University of Southampton)

13:55-14:50 Panel: ‘Alien’ Disability

Moderator: Irina Metzler

‘A horse ought to be held dear due to its goodness; because one should desire goodness over beauty’: Utility, Disfigurement, and Occupational Health in Later Medieval Horse Medicine

(Sunny Harrison, University of Leeds)

Mohammed the Epileptic: Religious Propaganda in the Middle Ages

(Hillary Burgardt, Swansea University)

14:50-15:05 Coffee Break

15:05-16:00 Panel: Periodization in Disability History: A Roundtable

Participants:

David Turner (Swansea University, panel co-ordinator and chair)

Trish Skinner (Swansea University)

Bianca Frohne (Universität Bremen)

Daniel Blackie (University of Oulu)

16:00-16:35 Concluding Keynote Address

Disease, Disability and Medicine: Past, Present and Future(s)

Christina Lee (University of Nottingham)

16:35-16:45 Closing Remarks

Many thanks to the organiser of this year, Irina Metzler.