Archives de catégorie : Meetings – Conferences

Conference – La vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge – Yann Cantin – Cité des Sciences de Paris

La vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge

Vendredi 9 juin, de 18h30 à 20h. RDV à l’auditorium, niveau 0.

Dans le cadre du cycle de conférence organisé par la Cité des Sciences « Dans la tête de l’homme médiéval »

L’imaginaire collectif retient du Moyen Âge la chevalerie, les châteaux forts et les cathédrales. La réalité de ces mille ans d’histoire (V° – XVI° siècles) est plus riche et plus contrastée comme en attestent les recherches récentes en archéologie et en histoire. Comment l’homme médiéval se représente le monde ? Quelles sont ses connaissances en astronomie, en médecine ? Quels sont ses croyances et ses rites ?

« Quelle était la vie des Sourds au Moyen Âge ? Serait-elle si obscure comme le disaient les auteurs du XIXe siècle ? Ou alors, bien plus libre que l’on pensait ? La période médiévale était pourtant la matrice de notre langue, le noétomalalien. C’est dans ce contexte particulier entre le développement des centres monastiques, la croissance des villes, les échanges des idées entre les différents royaumes, duchés et comtés, que les communautés sourdes ont pu trouver leur place. De ce que l’on sait,  les communautés sourdes du XVIIIe siècle sont le résultat d’un long processus commencé mille années plus tôt. »

Avec Yann Cantin, historien, maître de conférence à l’université de Paris 8

Interprétation Français/LSF assurée.

Accès gratuit sur inscription : https://www.weezevent.com/la-vie-des-sourds-au-moyen-age

Organisator website

Conference – The Medieval Brain – University of York, 9-10-11 March 2017

Conference – The Medieval Brain – University of York, 9-10-11 March 2017

medieval-brain

 

Reminder of the CFP :

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this three-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Thursday 9th, Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Carole Rawcliffe (University of East Anglia)

Corinne Saunders (Durham University)

Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University)

 

Find the programm draft here

Programme – Disability and Religion, 10th Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World, Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

f

Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World

10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 2nd December

10:00 Welcome (Irina Metzler, Swansea University)

10:15-11:15 Opening Keynote Address

Responsibility, Sin, and Impairment in the Middle Ages

Wendy J. Turner (Augusta University)

11:15-12:45 Panel: Disabled Religious: Saints, Monks and Anchoresses

Moderator: Alicia Spencer-Hall

Disability or Super-ability? Saints’ Infirmities as a Tool for Constructing Sanctity

(Jenni Kuuliala, University of Tampere)

Deaf, Monks and Sign Language

(Yann Cantin, Université-Paris 8)

Ancrene Riwle: Disabling the Able, How Un-Medieval!

(Stan Booth, University of Winchester)

12:45-13:45 Lunch

13:45-14:40 Panel: Non-conformist Bodies

Moderator: Stan Booth

The Hun and the Hunchback

Mark Humphries (Swansea University)

‘Sumo michi baculum’: Problematizing the Purpose of ‘Walking Sticks’ in the Late Middle Ages

(Rachael Gillibrand, University of Leeds)

14:40-15:35 Panel: Miracles and Metaphors

Moderator: Ninon Dubourg

The Cure-Seeking Experiences of Disabled Children in Twelfth-Century English Miracula

(Ruth Salter, University of Reading)

A Double Absence: Cupid and Blind Lucy Reading John Donne’s ‘Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day, Being The Shortest Day’

(Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester)

15:35-16:00 Coffee Break

16:00-16:50 Panel: Relevance of Digital Tools for Medieval Manuscript Studies

(Erin Connelly, University of Pennsylvania)

This panel will take the form of a presentation followed by a workshop inviting audience participation and discussion

SATURDAY 3rd December

9:15-10:45 Panel: Disability and Mental ‘Abnormality’

Moderator: Wendy Turner

Graeco-Latin Medical Learning in an Early Irish Pseudo-Etymology of Boicmell ‘Fool’

(Anna Matheson, Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique, Rennes)

The Holy Fool and the Madman: When was Mental Abnormality a Disability?

(Claire Trenery, Royal Holloway, University of London)

Skiptingr, Congeon and Wehselkind: Exploring the Medieval Discourse on Changelings and Idiocy through Vernacular Insults

(Rose Sawyer, University of Leeds)

10:45-11:05 Coffee Break

11:05-12:00 Panel: Disability and Leprosy

Moderator: Trish Skinner

Disability and Ability within the Leper Houses of Medieval Normandy

(Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library)

Redeemed by a Good Death!

(Timothy Jones, University of Cardiff)

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-13:55 Panel: Disability in the Earlier Middle Ages

Moderator: Christina Lee

Finding Disability in Early Medieval Sources: The Case of Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester

(Alison Hudson, The British Library)

A Disabled Corpse – An Exploration of the Potential Significance of an Anglo Saxon Burial Cluster from Great Chesterford, Essex

(Stephanie Evelyn-Wright, University of Southampton)

13:55-14:50 Panel: ‘Alien’ Disability

Moderator: Irina Metzler

‘A horse ought to be held dear due to its goodness; because one should desire goodness over beauty’: Utility, Disfigurement, and Occupational Health in Later Medieval Horse Medicine

(Sunny Harrison, University of Leeds)

Mohammed the Epileptic: Religious Propaganda in the Middle Ages

(Hillary Burgardt, Swansea University)

14:50-15:05 Coffee Break

15:05-16:00 Panel: Periodization in Disability History: A Roundtable

Participants:

David Turner (Swansea University, panel co-ordinator and chair)

Trish Skinner (Swansea University)

Bianca Frohne (Universität Bremen)

Daniel Blackie (University of Oulu)

16:00-16:35 Concluding Keynote Address

Disease, Disability and Medicine: Past, Present and Future(s)

Christina Lee (University of Nottingham)

16:35-16:45 Closing Remarks

Many thanks to the organiser of this year, Irina Metzler.

Conference – Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History – Monica H. Green – AHA conference

Session : Historians and Geneticists in Collaborative Research

AHA Session 254
Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:30 PM-5:00 PM
Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center, Ballroom Level) Denver.
Chair:
John R. McNeill, Georgetown University

Session Abstract:

An editorial in Nature (25 May 2016) notes that historians have been critical of recent interpretations of European migrations by geneticists, but from their armchairs. Princeton Medieval historian Patrick Geary is quoted as urging historians to be more proactive and take part in genetic research: “If historians do not get involved and engage with this technology seriously, we’re going to see more and more studies that are done by geneticists with very little input from historians, or from frankly second-rate historians.” This session includes presentations by two historians and one geneticist, to show how collaborative study linking historians and geneticists can advance the quality of historical studies relying on genetic information. The session is intended to encourage discussion among historians, especially early-career historians, on how involvement in research and study of the genetic-historical literature can lead to rewarding careers that substantially advance knowledge of the human past from this new angle.

Cherry-Picking or Consilience? Human Actors, Invisible Microbes, and (Non-)collaboration in Disease History

Saturday, January 7, 2017: 3:50 PM, Mile High Ballroom 3A (Colorado Convention Center)

Monica H. Green, Arizona State University

Every pre-modern historian knows how rarely we have all the evidence we want. We know that something happened in history’s silences because we know that human societies persisted. So, too, the palaeogeneticist must assume the continuity of life between the few random molecular fossils uncovered from the past, for that is the basic premise of evolutionary theory. But in all fields that deal with gap-ridden evidence, the question remains: what are legitimate methods for construing what happened in those gaps?Although climate scientists and historians now work toward consilience of written and physical data, that happy détente has yet to be achieved in biological history. Yes, the call to resist “cherry picking those milestones in human history that are best recorded” should be heeded. But what happens when this new kind of bioarchaeology treads into territory historians consider theirs, where there are written records? Who cedes to whom?

This paper will focus not on human genetics but on the molecular histories of the pathogens that kill and maim us. I will use the example of the Second Plague Pandemic (14th-19th centuries) to assert that consilience with History, with a capital ‘H’, is urgently needed for one simple reason: because the most disruptive biological actors in epidemic circumstances are humans themselves.

More information on the AHA program !