CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Desire, Disability, Disorder at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

Desire, Disability, Disorder

Organizer: Matthew Giancarlo, University of Kentucky (matthew.giancarlo@uky.edu)

This session will explore the intersection of forms of disability with artistic and legal discourses about desire and social order: erotic, familial, political. How is “disability” framed as both limiting and enabling, as seen from different speaking positions? What kind of alternative orders are visible from —or lisible through— “disordered” bodies? How does the imaginative representation of a handicap either fulfill or frustrate different kinds of desires? These questions and others will be considered, from different historical perspectives and in light of the growing body of research on medieval disability and the law. Paper proposals dealing with specific authors and texts are encouraged.

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *